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I have the following sample class with these two methods:

Process.java:

public class Process {

    public Process() {
    }

    public static void countRecursive(int num) {
        System.out.println("countRecursive: " + num++);
        if (num <= 10) countRecursive(num);
        else return;
    }

    public static void countWhile(int num) {
        do System.out.println("countWhile: " + num++);
        while (num <= 10);
    }

}

Main class:

public static void main(String[] args) {        

    Process.countRecursive(0);
    Process.countWhile(0);

}

Output:

countRecursive: 0
countRecursive: 1
countRecursive: 2
countRecursive: 3
countRecursive: 4
countRecursive: 5
countRecursive: 6
countRecursive: 7
countRecursive: 8
countRecursive: 9
countRecursive: 10

countWhile: 0
countWhile: 1
countWhile: 2
countWhile: 3
countWhile: 4
countWhile: 5
countWhile: 6
countWhile: 7
countWhile: 8
countWhile: 9
countWhile: 10

But I want to know which "technique" it is recommended to use and why.

Thanks in advance.

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closed as not a real question by Nambari, Bhavik Ambani, kazanaki, qegal, bestsss Dec 21 '12 at 10:12

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

10  
Using recursion as a replacement for a simple while loop is like using a hammer with a screw: you are not using the correct tool for the job. –  Laf Dec 19 '12 at 15:57
2  
It's more like using an nuke to kill a mosquito. –  ThiefMaster Dec 19 '12 at 16:33
    
There may be some odd cases to the contrary, but in 99.9% of scenarios recursion will be slower. (However, keep in mind that there are many cases where the additional utility gained from recursion results in a much faster overall algorithm.) –  Hot Licks Dec 19 '12 at 23:49
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8 Answers 8

up vote 36 down vote accepted

Recursion will be slower because of the method call overhead and call stack usage.

Java isn't performing tail call optimization either so don't count on it.

Another drawback might be the risk of a StackOverflowError in case you are filling up the stack.

If you are doing this just to try things out I suggest using VisualVM which can be found in the java JDK. It is a profiler which can be used to benchmark this kind of situation.

Just a sidenote: I do not recommend using recursion just to be fancy. Use it if you really need it (traversing trees for example).

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10  
+1 There are examples where recursion is faster and/or cleaner, but these are the exception to the rule. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 19 '12 at 16:07
1  
+1 Nice explanation and I'll try your recommendations. –  Oscar Jara Dec 19 '12 at 16:11
1  
You may also want to look at the Java OP code created by the code. I know looking at the Assembly created by similar examples in C/C++ makes it very obvious. –  Chris Dec 19 '12 at 20:40
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You should run code with time measurement. Here you have my output for 100 recursions/ 100 while loops:

Recursive time: 90941
While time: 5180

This clearly shows that while loop is faster than recursion.

You can check my measurements by running this code:

public class Process {

    public Process() {
    }

    public static void countRecursive(int num) {
        num++;
        if (num <= 100) countRecursive(num);
        else return;
    }

    public static void countWhile(int num) {
        do
            num++;
        while (num <= 100);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Long start = System.nanoTime();        
        Process.countRecursive(0);
        System.out.println("Recursive time: " + (System.nanoTime() - start));
        Long startWhile = System.nanoTime();
        Process.countWhile(0);
        System.out.println("While time: " + (System.nanoTime() - startWhile));

    }

}
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1  
+1 Using this technique to time how long something takes is a pretty good way to handle these types of problems, especially when a full profiler is overkill for what you're measuring. –  Kevin Dec 19 '12 at 23:33
    
It's somewhat invalid, however, to do the loop with nothing of substance in the body. In particular, if the loop called a procedure that would swamp most of the difference. And if the optimizer got hold of that loop it might very well eliminate it entirely. –  Hot Licks Dec 20 '12 at 18:13
1  
the microbenchmark is just horrid (and no offense here): I always advise AGAINST measuring via microbenchmarks, most people do get them wrong. This one is a perfect example: no warming up (so the code is interpreted), not using the result and no write = code is dead and then unused, it could well fit within the same nanosecond when compiled. Please, do not advise using microbenchmarks, they might be fun but if a person knows how to write them won't ask the question in the 1st place. 9 people love votes this one just confirms the story -- people get them wrong. –  bestsss Dec 21 '12 at 10:09
    
@bestsss do you mean eg. code.google.com/p/caliper/wiki/JavaMicrobenchmarks ? –  Mr Phi Nov 14 '13 at 13:27
    
@MrPhi yes caliper is a good one –  bestsss Dec 18 '13 at 7:16
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I would not suggest using Recursion, as each recursion is stored on stack. So, you need to store method parameters, local variables, etc, for each recursive call, to maintain the state of method before that call.

Also, you should obviously not go with recursion with this kind of problem. It should be left for some specific task, only when you really can't avoid using them.

Further, you can also benchmark your code to see which one runs faster. You will get an idea.

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Recursive calls add stack frames to the call stack. Loops do not. Loops are generally faster than recursion, unless the recursion is part of an algorithm like divide and conquer (which your example is not).

You should be able to time the execution of each of your methods and find out how much faster one is than the other.

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In general, recursion is optimized to loops if possible, meaning that for various reasons, including stack frame allocation and stack frame overflows iteration is favorable over recursion if the two solutions are otherwise equal. See Tail Recursion
So ignoring the fact that Java doesn't optimize Tail Recursion, loops should be faster.

Also take a look at this

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In java, recursion is little expensive compared to while loop because it requires the allocation of a new stack frame. Recursion may well be faster where the alternative is to explicitly manage a stack

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In general, I favour iteration (e.g. a while or for loop) over recursion because:

  • Iteration is simpler
  • If you recurse too deeply, you can get a stackoverflow exception. This cannot happen with iteration.
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What everyone else said is true. I'd like to add one more thing: For the problem you posted, counting 1 to 10, using recursion or iteration will be fine either way because they both take a negligible amount of time to run. In general, on modern computer systems, you don't need to worry too much about how long a process will take to complete (unless you're dealing with large data sets) because memory is so cheap and CPUs are so powerful.

Usually, you write a program however you feel the most comfortable first, using good programming practices. If it takes too long to run after that, you optimize it then.

Not that looking into how iteration and recursion compare at this level is a bad thing. Again, iteration is usually preferable to recursion. My point is the lesson to learn is that while there are ways to make your code run quickly, you often don't need to worry about them when you're working with small data sets :)

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I would even say that the apathy you condone for small data sets is yet dangerous. Where do you draw the line as to what 'small' is? what if you're in industry and someone needs to use the code you've written on a much grander scale, or as part of a speed-critical loop? Bad practice in learning (more often than not) carries on to bad practice in industry. –  Sean Allred Dec 19 '12 at 23:52
    
I kind of agree and kind of disagree. My opinion is that if you can write an algorithm so that it takes two microseconds per data item and is very easy to read, or write it so that it takes one microsecond per data item but is nearly unreadable, I would rather write it the first way. I would only change it if the code could definitely be shown to be used in a performance-critical loop. Of course, if I can write an algorithm to run twice as quickly without affecting readability, there's no reason not to. Also, if my not-super-optimized code winds up in critical code later, it can be refactored. –  Kevin Dec 20 '12 at 4:30
1  
I see your point, but I'd only change to more readable code when it's no more than a ten percent difference in time complexity. I know this isn't what you meant and computers nowadays are extremely fast, but a 50% (1ms vs 2ms) difference is significant when you have a million data items. Now if you went through the trouble (read overkill more often than not) of doing a complexity analysis on your algorithm and the two were asymptotic, then yeah. Readability is definitely the way to go. You can't confuse the reader, but the reader is not who ultimately matters most. –  Sean Allred Dec 20 '12 at 17:08
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