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I’m doing some log analysis and examining the length of a queue every few minutes. I know when the files entered the “queue”(a simple filesystem directory) and when they left. With that, I can plot the length of the queue at given intervals. So far so good, though the code is a bit procedural:

ts = pd.date_range(start='2012-12-05 10:15:00', end='2012-12-05 15:45', freq='5t')
tmpdf = df.copy()
for d in ts:
    tmpdf[d] = (tmpdf.date_in < d)&(tmpdf.date_out > d)
queue_length = tmpdf[list(ts)].apply(func=np.sum)

But, I want to compare the real length with the length at a given consumption rate(e.g. 1 per second, etc...). I can’t just subtract a constant because the queue can’t go beyond zero.

I have done it, but at a very procedural way. I have tried to use pandas window functions with little success, because can’t access the result that’s already been calculated for the previous element. This was the first thing I tried which is deadly wrong:

imagenes_min = 60 * imagenes_sec
def roll(window_vals):
    return max(0.0, window_vals[-1] + window_vals[-2] - imagenes_min)

pd.rolling_apply(arg=imagenes_introducidas, func=roll , window = 2, min_periods=2)

The real code is like this, which I think its too verbose and slow:

imagenes_sec = 1.05
imagenes_min = imagenes_sec * 60 *5
imagenes_introducidas = df3.aet.resample(rule='5t',how='count')
imagenes_introducidas.head()

def accum_minus(serie, rate):
    acc = 0
    retval = np.zeros(len(serie))
    for i,a in enumerate(serie.values):
       acc = max(0, a + acc - rate)
       retval[i] = acc
    return Series(data=retval, index=serie.index)

est_1 = accum_minus(imagenes_introducidas, imagenes_min)
comparativa = DataFrame(data = { 'real': queue_length, 'est_1_sec': est_1 })
comparativa.plot()

compar

This seems an easy task but I don’t know how to do it properly. May be pandas isn’t the tool but some numpy or scipy magic.

UPDATE: df3 is like this(some columns ommited):

                               aet             date_out
date_in                                               
2012-12-05 10:08:59.318600  Z2XG17  2012-12-05 10:09:37.172300
2012-12-05 10:08:59.451300  Z2XG17  2012-12-05 10:09:38.048800
2012-12-05 10:08:59.587400  Z2XG17  2012-12-05 10:09:39.044100

UPDATE 2: This seems faster, still not very elegant

imagenes_sec = 1.05
imagenes_min = imagenes_sec * 60 *5
imagenes_introducidas = df3.aet.resample(rule='5t',how='count')

def add_or_zero(x, y):
    return max(0.0, x + y - imagenes_min)

v_add_or_zero = np.frompyfunc(add_or_zero, 2,1)
xx = v_add_or_zero.accumulate(imagenes_introducidas.values, dtype=np.object)

dd = DataFrame(data = {'est_1_sec' : xx, 'real': queue_length}, index=imagenes_introducidas.index)
dd.plot()
share|improve this question
    
Eeep! The issue is that each acc needs to know about all of the previous accs, so I don't see how this can be achieved without a for loop... however there may be a numpy trick. –  Andy Hayden Dec 19 '12 at 17:07
    
Do you think you could include df3? So we can have a go at improving accum_minus, is this the main/slow part of the question (or am I mistaken). –  Andy Hayden Dec 19 '12 at 17:17
    
@hayden I know, but if window functions could access to output values it would be as easy as manipulating the last computed result. –  Samuel Dec 19 '12 at 20:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about interleaving inbound and outbound events into a single frame?

In [15]: df
Out[15]: 
                      date_in     aet                    date_out
0  2012-12-05 10:08:59.318600  Z2XG17  2012-12-05 10:09:37.172300
1  2012-12-05 10:08:59.451300  Z2XG17  2012-12-05 10:09:38.048800
2  2012-12-05 10:08:59.587400  Z2XG17  2012-12-05 10:09:39.044100

In [16]: inbnd = pd.DataFrame({'event': 1}, index=df.date_in)

In [17]: outbnd = pd.DataFrame({'event': -1}, index=df.date_out)

In [18]: real_stream = pd.concat([inbnd, outbnd]).sort()

In [19]: real_stream
Out[19]: 
                            event
date                             
2012-12-05 10:08:59.318600      1
2012-12-05 10:08:59.451300      1
2012-12-05 10:08:59.587400      1
2012-12-05 10:09:37.172300     -1
2012-12-05 10:09:38.048800     -1
2012-12-05 10:09:39.044100     -1

In this format (one decrement for every increment), queue depth can easily be computed with cumsum().

In [20]: real_stream['depth'] = real_stream.event.cumsum()

In [21]: real_stream
Out[21]: 
                            event  depth
date                                    
2012-12-05 10:08:59.318600      1      1
2012-12-05 10:08:59.451300      1      2
2012-12-05 10:08:59.587400      1      3
2012-12-05 10:09:37.172300     -1      2
2012-12-05 10:09:38.048800     -1      1
2012-12-05 10:09:39.044100     -1      0

To simulate different consumption rates, replace all real outbound timestamps with a manufactured series of outbound timestamps at a fixed frequency. Since cumsum() function won't work in this case, I created a counting function that takes a floor value.

In [53]: outbnd_1s = pd.DataFrame({'event': -1},
   ....:                          index=real_stream.event.resample("S").index)

In [54]: fixed_stream = pd.concat([inbnd, outbnd_1s]).sort()

In [55]: def make_floor_counter(floor):
   ....:     count = [0]
   ....:     def process(n):
   ....:         count[0] += n
   ....:         if count[0] < floor
   ....:             count[0] = floor
   ....:         return count[0]
   ....:     return process
   ....: 

In [56]: fixed_stream['depth'] = fixed_stream.event.map(make_floor_counter(0))

In [57]: fixed_stream.head(8)
Out[57]: 
                            event  depth
2012-12-05 10:08:59            -1      0
2012-12-05 10:08:59.318600      1      1
2012-12-05 10:08:59.451300      1      2
2012-12-05 10:08:59.587400      1      3
2012-12-05 10:09:00            -1      2
2012-12-05 10:09:01            -1      1
2012-12-05 10:09:02            -1      0
2012-12-05 10:09:03            -1      0
share|improve this answer
    
I like the approach. I will try to timeit to see if it's really faster, but I really like the idea. Thanks. –  Samuel Dec 20 '12 at 8:23

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