Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm running some bizarre Postgres migration code from OpenCongress and I'm getting this error:

RuntimeError: ERROR     C25001  MVACUUM cannot run inside a transaction block
Fxact.c  L2649   RPreventTransactionChain: VACUUM FULL ANALYZE;

So I'd like to try running it without getting wrapped by a transaction.

share|improve this question
    
Please tell a bit more about the migration you're running, the database you're using and which adapter in case it's not the default mysql/sqlite ones. That way I think a more usable answer will follow your question. –  Ariejan Sep 9 '09 at 14:36
    
Sorry, just saw you're using Postgres. –  Ariejan Sep 9 '09 at 14:37
    
In the case of this particular migration I found out that the VACUUM command isn't really necessary (it only does garbage collection), so removing that call worked, but I'm still curious to know how to instruct Rails to run migrations without transactions. –  obvio171 Sep 12 '09 at 15:19

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

ActiveRecord::Migration has the following private method that gets called when running migrations:

def ddl_transaction(&block)
  if Base.connection.supports_ddl_transactions?
    Base.transaction { block.call }
  else
    block.call
  end
end

As you can see this will wrap the migration in a transaction if the connection supports it.

In ActiveRecord::ConnectionAdapters::PostgreSQLAdapter you have:

def supports_ddl_transactions?
  true
end

SQLite version 2.0 and beyond also support migration transactions. In ActiveRecord::ConnectionAdapters::SQLiteAdapter you have:

def supports_ddl_transactions?
  sqlite_version >= '2.0.0'
end

So then, to skip transactions, you need to somehow circumvent this. Something like this might work, though I haven't tested it:

class ActiveRecord::Migration
  class << self
    def no_transaction
      @no_transaction = true
    end

    def no_transaction?
      @no_transaction == true
    end
  end

  private

    def ddl_transaction(&block)
      if Base.connection.supports_ddl_transactions? && !self.class.no_transaction?
        Base.transaction { block.call }
      else
        block.call
      end
    end
end

You could then set up your migration as follows:

class SomeMigration < ActiveRecord::Migration
  no_transaction

  def self.up
    # Do something
  end

  def self.down
    # Do something
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Couldn't get this to work...but clever idea! –  Christopher Pfohl Nov 29 '12 at 17:07
    
Given that my original post is over three years old, I wouldn't necessarily expect this to work anymore. –  Peter Wagenet Jan 29 '13 at 21:00

The above answer is broken for Rails 3 as ddl_transaction was moved into ActiveRecord::Migrator. I could not figure out a way to monkey patch that class, so here is an alternate solution:

I added a file under lib/

module NoMigrationTransactions
  def self.included(base)                                                                                                                  
    base.class_eval do
      alias_method :old_migrate, :migrate

      say "Disabling transactions"

      @@no_transaction = true
      # Force no transactions
      ActiveRecord::Base.connection.instance_eval do
        alias :old_ddl :supports_ddl_transactions?

        def supports_ddl_transactions?
          false
        end
      end

      def migrate(*args)
        old_migrate(*args)

        # Restore
        if @@no_transaction
          say "Restoring transactions"
          ActiveRecord::Base.connection.instance_eval do
            alias :supports_ddl_transactions? :old_ddl
          end
        end
      end
    end
  end
end

Then all you have to do in your migration is:

class PopulateTrees < ActiveRecord::Migration
  include NoMigrationTransactions
end

What this does is disable transactions when the migration class is loaded (hopefully after all previous ones were loaded and before any future ones are loaded), then after the migration, restore whatever old transaction capabilities there were.

share|improve this answer
    
Can anyone confirm that this works for rails ~> 3.2.6? I tried it but it had no effect. –  Noach Magedman Oct 28 '12 at 12:40

An extremely simple, Rails-version-independent (2.3, 3.2, 4.0, doesn't matter) way about this is to simply add execute("commit;") to the beginning of your migration, and then write SQL.

This immediately closes the Rails-started transaction, and allows you to write raw SQL that can create its own transactions. In the below example, I use an .update_all and a subselect LIMIT to handle updating a huge database table.

As an example,

class ChangeDefaultTabIdOfZeroToNilOnUsers < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def self.up
    execute("commit;")
    while User.find_by_default_tab_id(0).present? do
      User.update_all %{default_tab_id = NULL}, %{id IN (
        SELECT id FROM users WHERE default_tab_id = 0 LIMIT 1000
      )}.squish!
    end
  end

  def self.down
    raise ActiveRecord::IrreversibleMigration
  end
end
share|improve this answer

I'm not saying this is the "right way" to do it, but what worked for me was to run just that one migration in isolation.

rake db:migrate:up VERSION=20120801151807

where 20120801151807 is the timestamp of the migration.

Apparently, it doesn't use a transaction when you run a single migration.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, none of the above solutions worked, but this is really helpful. Thanks! –  hurshagrawal Dec 21 '12 at 16:42

There's now a method disable_ddl_transaction! that allows this, e.g.:

class AddIndexesToTablesBasedOnUsage < ActiveRecord::Migration
  disable_ddl_transaction!
  def up
    execute %{
      CREATE INDEX CONCURRENTLY index_reservations_subscription_id ON reservations (subscription_id);
    }
  end
  def down
    execute %{DROP INDEX index_reservations_subscription_id}
  end
end
share|improve this answer

As hacky as this is adding 'commit;' to the beginning of my sql worked for me, but that's for SQL Server, not sure if this works for postgres...

Example: CREATE FULLTEXT INDEX ... is illegal inside a sql-server user transaction.

so...:

execute <<-SQL
    commit;
    create fulltext index --...yada yada yada
SQL

works fine... We'll see if I regret it later.

share|improve this answer
    
This is actually the least hackish of all the ways I've found around :) –  Flevour Sep 25 '13 at 13:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.