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I have been trying to improve query times for an existing Oracle database-driven application that has been running a little sluggish. The application executes several large queries, such as the one below, which can take over an hour to run. Replacing the DISTINCT with a GROUP BY clause in the query below shrank execution time from 100 minutes to 10 seconds. My understanding was that SELECT DISTINCT and GROUP BY operated in pretty much the same way. Why such a huge disparity between execution times? What is the difference in how the query is executed on the back-end? Is there ever a situation where SELECT DISTINCT runs faster?

Note: In the following query, WHERE TASK_INVENTORY_STEP.STEP_TYPE = 'TYPE A' represents just one of a number of ways that results can be filtered. This example was provided to show the reasoning for joining all of the tables that do not have columns included in the SELECT and would result in about a tenth of all available data

SQL using DISTINCT:

SELECT DISTINCT 
    ITEMS.ITEM_ID,
    ITEMS.ITEM_CODE,
    ITEMS.ITEMTYPE,
    ITEM_TRANSACTIONS.STATUS,
    (SELECT COUNT(PKID) 
        FROM ITEM_PARENTS 
        WHERE PARENT_ITEM_ID = ITEMS.ITEM_ID
        ) AS CHILD_COUNT
FROM
    ITEMS
    INNER JOIN ITEM_TRANSACTIONS 
        ON ITEMS.ITEM_ID = ITEM_TRANSACTIONS.ITEM_ID 
        AND ITEM_TRANSACTIONS.FLAG = 1
    LEFT OUTER JOIN ITEM_METADATA 
        ON ITEMS.ITEM_ID = ITEM_METADATA.ITEM_ID
    LEFT OUTER JOIN JOB_INVENTORY 
        ON ITEMS.ITEM_ID = JOB_INVENTORY.ITEM_ID     
    LEFT OUTER JOIN JOB_TASK_INVENTORY 
        ON JOB_INVENTORY.JOB_ITEM_ID = JOB_TASK_INVENTORY.JOB_ITEM_ID
    LEFT OUTER JOIN JOB_TASKS 
        ON JOB_TASK_INVENTORY.TASKID = JOB_TASKS.TASKID                              
    LEFT OUTER JOIN JOBS 
        ON JOB_TASKS.JOB_ID = JOBS.JOB_ID
    LEFT OUTER JOIN TASK_INVENTORY_STEP 
        ON JOB_INVENTORY.JOB_ITEM_ID = TASK_INVENTORY_STEP.JOB_ITEM_ID 
    LEFT OUTER JOIN TASK_STEP_INFORMATION 
        ON TASK_INVENTORY_STEP.JOB_ITEM_ID = TASK_STEP_INFORMATION.JOB_ITEM_ID
WHERE 
    TASK_INVENTORY_STEP.STEP_TYPE = 'TYPE A'
ORDER BY 
    ITEMS.ITEM_CODE

SQL using GROUP BY:

SELECT
    ITEMS.ITEM_ID,
    ITEMS.ITEM_CODE,
    ITEMS.ITEMTYPE,
    ITEM_TRANSACTIONS.STATUS,
    (SELECT COUNT(PKID) 
        FROM ITEM_PARENTS 
        WHERE PARENT_ITEM_ID = ITEMS.ITEM_ID
        ) AS CHILD_COUNT
FROM
    ITEMS
    INNER JOIN ITEM_TRANSACTIONS 
        ON ITEMS.ITEM_ID = ITEM_TRANSACTIONS.ITEM_ID 
        AND ITEM_TRANSACTIONS.FLAG = 1
    LEFT OUTER JOIN ITEM_METADATA 
        ON ITEMS.ITEM_ID = ITEM_METADATA.ITEM_ID
    LEFT OUTER JOIN JOB_INVENTORY 
        ON ITEMS.ITEM_ID = JOB_INVENTORY.ITEM_ID     
    LEFT OUTER JOIN JOB_TASK_INVENTORY 
        ON JOB_INVENTORY.JOB_ITEM_ID = JOB_TASK_INVENTORY.JOB_ITEM_ID
    LEFT OUTER JOIN JOB_TASKS 
        ON JOB_TASK_INVENTORY.TASKID = JOB_TASKS.TASKID                              
    LEFT OUTER JOIN JOBS 
        ON JOB_TASKS.JOB_ID = JOBS.JOB_ID
    LEFT OUTER JOIN TASK_INVENTORY_STEP 
        ON JOB_INVENTORY.JOB_ITEM_ID = TASK_INVENTORY_STEP.JOB_ITEM_ID 
    LEFT OUTER JOIN TASK_STEP_INFORMATION 
        ON TASK_INVENTORY_STEP.JOB_ITEM_ID = TASK_STEP_INFORMATION.JOB_ITEM_ID
WHERE 
    TASK_INVENTORY_STEP.STEP_TYPE = 'TYPE A'
GROUP BY
    ITEMS.ITEM_ID,
    ITEMS.ITEM_CODE,
    ITEMS.ITEMTYPE,
    ITEM_TRANSACTIONS.STATUS
ORDER BY 
    ITEMS.ITEM_CODE

Here is the Oracle query plan for the query using DISTINCT:

Oracle query plan for query using DISTINCT

Here is the Oracle query plan for the query using GROUP BY:

Oracle query plan for query using GROUP BY

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2  
Show the query with group by. –  Hamlet Hakobyan Dec 19 '12 at 16:29
    
I don't have the answer to your question, but I expect that seeing BOTH queries, their explain plans and the number of logical GETs might help in understanding (FWIW I would have expected DISTINCT to have a performance advantage, if at all). –  symcbean Dec 19 '12 at 16:30
    
In SQL Server you can get Query Execution Plans.. can you get something similar in Oracle? That would tell you where the difference was. –  Dan-o Dec 19 '12 at 16:31
1  
BTW: why the big long chain of LEFT joins when you only want records with a 'TYPE A' at the end? –  symcbean Dec 19 '12 at 16:31
    
Two things; 1) Put your GROUP BY query in your question and 2) Run an EXPLAIN PLAN on each query and also add the output to the question. –  Robotic Cat Dec 19 '12 at 16:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The performance difference is probably due to the execution of the subquery in the SELECT clause. I am guessing that it is re-executing this query for every row before the distinct. For the group by, it would execute once after the group by.

Try replacing it with a join, instead:

select . . .,
       parentcnt
from . . . left outer join
      (SELECT PARENT_ITEM_ID, COUNT(PKID) as parentcnt
       FROM ITEM_PARENTS 
      ) p
      on items.item_id = p.parent_item_id
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - This is exactly what I was thinking of too (including the potential solution), but I don't know enough about Oracle to be sure. –  Clockwork-Muse Dec 19 '12 at 16:58
1  
This would seem to be the bottleneck. I tried removing the subquery and the query executed as quickly as the GROUP BY version (100 min vs 20 sec). Thanks! –  willOEM Dec 19 '12 at 18:53

I'm fairly sure that GROUP BY and DISTINCT have roughly the same execution plan.

The difference here since we have to guess (since we don't have the explain plans) is IMO that the inline subquery gets executed AFTER the GROUP BY but BEFORE the DISTINCT.

So if your query returns 1M rows and gets aggregated to 1k rows:

  • The GROUP BY query would have run the subquery 1000 times,
  • Whereas the DISTINCT query would have run the subquery 1000000 times.

The tkprof explain plan would help demonstrate this hypothesis.


While we're discussing this, I think it's important to note that the way the query is written is misleading both to the reader and to the optimizer: you obviously want to find all rows from item/item_transactions that have a TASK_INVENTORY_STEP.STEP_TYPE with a value of "TYPE A".

IMO your query would have a better plan and would be more easily readable if written like this:

SELECT ITEMS.ITEM_ID,
       ITEMS.ITEM_CODE,
       ITEMS.ITEMTYPE,
       ITEM_TRANSACTIONS.STATUS,
       (SELECT COUNT(PKID) 
          FROM ITEM_PARENTS 
         WHERE PARENT_ITEM_ID = ITEMS.ITEM_ID) AS CHILD_COUNT
  FROM ITEMS
  JOIN ITEM_TRANSACTIONS 
    ON ITEMS.ITEM_ID = ITEM_TRANSACTIONS.ITEM_ID 
   AND ITEM_TRANSACTIONS.FLAG = 1
 WHERE EXISTS (SELECT NULL
                 FROM JOB_INVENTORY   
                 JOIN TASK_INVENTORY_STEP 
                   ON JOB_INVENTORY.JOB_ITEM_ID=TASK_INVENTORY_STEP.JOB_ITEM_ID
                WHERE TASK_INVENTORY_STEP.STEP_TYPE = 'TYPE A'
                  AND ITEMS.ITEM_ID = JOB_INVENTORY.ITEM_ID)

In many cases, a DISTINCT can be a sign that the query is not written properly (because a good query shouldn't return duplicates).

Note also that 4 tables are not used in your original select.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. The query given is just an example that shows one of the distantly joined tables being used to filter results. Columns from almost every table joined in this query could potentially be used in the WHERE clause. –  willOEM Dec 19 '12 at 18:56
    
You should still use SEMI-JOIN (EXISTS or IN) when appropriate instead of DISTINCT, it is clearer to both future reader and perhaps more importantly to the optimizer. –  Vincent Malgrat Dec 20 '12 at 8:46

The first thing that should be noted is the use of Distinct indicates a code smell, aka anti-pattern. It generally means that there is a missing join or an extra join that is generating duplicate data. Looking at your query above, I am guessing that the reason why group by is faster (without seeing the query), is that the location of the group by reduces the number of records that end up being returned. Whereas distinct is blowing out the result set and doing row by row comparisons.

Update to approach

Sorry, I should have been more clear. Records are generated when users perform certain tasks in the system, so there is no schedule. A user could generate a single record in a day or hundreds per-hour. The important things is that each time a user runs a search, up-to-date records must be returned, which makes me doubtful that a materialized view would work here, especially if the query populating it would take long to run.

I do believe this is the exact reason to use a materialized view. So the process would work this way. You take the long running query as the piece that builds out your materialized view, since we know the user only cares about "new" data after they perform some arbitrary task in the system. So what you want to do is query against this base materialized view, which can be refreshed constantly on the back-end, the persistence strategy involved should not choke out the materialized view (persisting a few hundred records at a time won't crush anything). What this will allow is Oracle to grab a read lock (note we don't care how many sources read our data, we only care about writers). In the worst case a user will have "stale" data for microseconds, so unless this is a financial trading system on Wall Street or a system for a nuclear reactor, these "blips" should go unnoticed by even the most eagle eyed users.

Code example of how to do this:

create materialized view dept_mv FOR UPDATE as select * from dept; 

Now the key to this is as long as you don' t invoke refresh you won't lose any of the persisted data. It will be up to you to determine when you want to "base line" your materialized view again (midnight perhaps?)

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1  
+1 for code smell. Queries joining tables through PK shouldn't return duplicates ; if they do maybe something is amiss :) –  Vincent Malgrat Dec 19 '12 at 17:00
    
You are definitely right on this point. The schema is pretty poorly designed, with a lot of redundancy, from many years of having modules with new tables tacked on without a schema overhaul. Unfortunately, I have to live with what I have. –  willOEM Dec 19 '12 at 18:58

You should use GROUP BY to apply aggregate operators to each group and DISTINCT if you only need to remove duplicates.

I think the performance is the same.

In your case i think you should use GROUP BY.

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