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I have an error parsing an underscore template, I keep getting an error saying:

Uncaught SyntaxError: Unexpected token else

Here is the template below: using Jade

script#viewLinksTemplate(type="text/template")
    table.table.table-condensed.table-striped
        caption Available links
        thead
            tr
                td link id
                td Name
                td View
                td Edit
                td Remove
        tbody
            {[ _.each(routes, function(route) { ]}

            tr
                td {{ route._id }}
                {[ if (typeof route.name !== 'undefined') { ]}
                td {{ route.name }}
                {[ } ]}
                {[ else { ]}
                td {{ route.stations.start.name }} - {{ route.stations.end.name }}
                {[ }; ]}
                td
                    a.btn.btn-primary(href="/route") View Route
                td
                    a.btn.btn-warning Edit Route
                td
                    a.btn.btn-danger Delete Route
            {[ }); ]}

The problem seems to be in the if/else statement. When I remove it completely the parts that are left on the template are rendered.

So, am I missing something with the syntax? All my other templates have javascript, and render correctly, except this one with the if/else.

Thanks

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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It's because the end of the if statement and the else are in two different evaluate tags. Merge them into one by replacing:

{[ } ]}
{[ else { ]}

with:

{[ } else { ]}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that works. Any reason why it doesn't work when the statements are in separate tags? Is it perhaps a Jade issue? I'll try change the template to HTML and see if I reproduce the error. –  nevi_me Dec 19 '12 at 17:25
2  
It's an issue with how Underscore builds the template. It essentially builds a string to eval, and in that generated code builds a string that contains the HTML output. When it encounters JS to evaluate it closes the HTML, inserts your JS and opens the HTML again. When you have separate tags like that the built string looks something like if (condition) { html += 'html inside if'; } html += ''; else { html += 'inside else', which obviously isn't valid JS. –  freejosh Dec 19 '12 at 17:32
    
Thanks for the explanation –  nevi_me Dec 19 '12 at 17:52
    
@nevi_me: You can look at the template function's source property (t = _.template(...); console.log(t.source)) if you want to see the compiled JavaScript version, then you'll see where the semicolons get inserted. –  mu is too short Dec 19 '12 at 18:45

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