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Example:

for (vector<string>::reverse_iterator it = myV.rbegin(); it != myV.rend(); ++it)
{
  cout << "current value is: " << *it << ", and current position is: " << /*  */ << endl;
}

I know I could check how many items there are in the vector, make a counter, and so on. But I wonder if there is a more direct way of checking current index without asserting that I got the length of the vector right.

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11  
std::distance(myV.rbegin(), it) –  James McNellis Dec 19 '12 at 18:00
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

vector Iterators support difference you can subtract you current iterator it from rbegin.


EDIT

As noted in a comment not all iterators support operator- so std::distance would have to be used. However I would not recommend this as std::distance will cause a liner time performance cost for iterators that are not random access while if you use it - begin() the compiler will tell you that won't work and then you can use distance if you must.

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Do the iterators remember their position with respect to the begin(), or is the std::distance called to compute the distance? –  tmaric Dec 19 '12 at 18:01
    
they are requried to have a globally overloaded operator for difference_type operator-(riter,riter) the way its implemented in you library may differ. Some implantation use a pointer for a random access iterator. –  rerun Dec 19 '12 at 18:04
    
What happens if I have a vector of 1e09 elements and call std::distance every time? Is it not better in that case to rely on the [] operator and write a standard for loop? –  tmaric Dec 19 '12 at 18:13
    
with a random access iterator its assured to be a constant time operation for all other iterators its linear time. –  rerun Dec 19 '12 at 18:21
    
Yep, that's what I mean. So, if I use std::distance each time, instead of writing a classical for loop and using [], I will have this much surplus "-" operations to compute the iterator position: (const time for the std::distance of a std::vector * vector size) . If I have huge vectors, that's a lot of differences that I can live without.. –  tmaric Dec 19 '12 at 18:27
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Subtract std::vector<T>::begin() (or rbegin() in your case) from the current iterator. Here's a small example:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> x;
    x.push_back(1);
    x.push_back(1);
    x.push_back(3);

    std::cout << "Elements: " << x.end() - x.begin();
    std::cout << "R-Elements: " << x.rend() - x.rbegin();
    return 0;    
}

As pointed out in a really great comment above, std::distance may be an even better choice. std::distance supports random access iterators in constant time, but also supports other categories of iterators in linear time.

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Iterators are used to allow generic algorithms to be written that invariant to a choice of a container. I've read in the STL Book that this is great, but may lead to performance drop because sometimes the member functions of a container are optimized for the container and will run faster than generic code that relies on iterators. In this case, if you are dealing with a large vector, you will be calling the std::distance, which although constant is not necessary. If you know that you will be using oly vector for this algorithm, you may recognize that it supports the direct access operator "[]" and write something like this:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>


using namespace std;

int main ()
{


    vector<int> myV;


    for (int I = 0; I < 100; ++I)
    {
        myV.push_back(I); 
    }


    for (int I = 0; I < myV.size(); ++I)
    {
        cout << "current value is: " << myV[I] 
            << ", and current position is: " << I << endl;
    }


    return 0; 
}

In case you are interested in speed, you can always try the different answers proposed here and measure the execution time. It will depend on the vector size probably.

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Keep a counter:

for (vector<string>::reverse_iterator it = myV.rbegin(), 
                                 int pos = myV.size; 
     it != myV.rend(), 
         --pos; 
     ++it)
{
    cout << "current value is: " << *it << ", and current position is: " << pos << endl;
}
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A lot of extra overhead for something that is trivially calculated from random access iterators (which vector iterators are). For, other types of iterators, will reduce the algorithmic complexity at a cost of additional code maintenance. –  Chad Dec 19 '12 at 18:05
    
The overhead is ginormous, yes, and the algorithmic complexity is off the charts, I agree. But I do actually like the iterator calculation better. –  The UNIX Man Dec 19 '12 at 18:12
1  
:D Just pointing out that for random access iterators this is unnecessary, and this question was specifically about std::vector. However, for large containers that are not random access (large maps, sets, lists, etc.) this is actually a good approach, but it has to be weighed against the expected size of the container. –  Chad Dec 19 '12 at 18:14
    
I agree with all that except that it's "A lot of overhead". It's just overhead. But doing the iterator calculation is still better. –  The UNIX Man Dec 19 '12 at 18:16
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