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I'm brand new to programming and Ruby is my first language. One exercise I'm working on is to create a multiplication table that does the following:

1x1 = 1
1x2 = 2
(etc)
2x1 = 2
2x2 = 4

I figured I'd do this by creating a nested while loop:

a = 1
b = 1

while a <= 5
    while b <= 5
        puts "#{a} * #{b} = #{a * b}"

        b += 1
    end
    a += 1  
end

When I run the script it prints the first set of times table (1x1 - 1x5) then stops. It doesn't iterate the parent loop. What am I doing wrong?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You never reset your b to 1. Look at the second while loop:

while b <= 5:
    ...
    b += 1

At the end of this loop, b = 6, and the loop exits. Then a += 1 is executed, and our outer loop begins. On all the next inner loop iterations, b = 6 however, and therefore isn't executed. Thus you need:

...
end
a += 1
b = 1
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It seems so simple now that it's been shown to me. Thanks for the response. –  Erik D Dec 18 '12 at 4:41
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You state that you're a novice so a while loop is ok for now. But when you improve both your programming and Ruby skills you should be able to write more idiomatic code. Something along those lines:

puts [*1..5].product([*1..5]).map { |x, y| "#{x} * #{y} = #{x*y}" }.join("\n")
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Hi @tokland. Thanks for the response. Yes, I'm definitely a novice. I'm trying to understand your code. Please tell me if I'm reading this correctly: You have an array range from 1-5 which is being multiplied by another array with a range of 1-5. Then the array values are being mapped into the x & y variables. Lastly you add a \n to return each line. Is that a correct interpretation of what you wrote? –  Erik D Dec 18 '12 at 23:02
    
Another question,why do you need the .join("\n") when using 'puts'? –  Erik D Dec 18 '12 at 23:10
    
After doing research, I see that product(array) doesn't multiply as I assumed, but returns all combinations of the array values. Thanks again! –  Erik D Dec 18 '12 at 23:56
    
@ErikD: Yeah, the name is a bit misleading, it's a cartesian product. And we need to join the lines to build a unique line. we could also write lines.each { |line| puts line }. Note that this is style is called "Functional programming", check it out in the wikipedia. Ruby is not a functional language but you can use a lot of its principles thanks to blocks (higher-order functions). –  tokland Dec 19 '12 at 7:35
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The "bookkeeping error" explained in the accepted answer is an easy one to make. It is one of the reasons the each method is generally preferred to a while loop:

(1..5).each do |a|
  (1..5).each do |b|
    puts "#{a} * #{b} = #{a * b}"
  end
end

No bookkeeping!

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