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I have two enum classes, say Enum1 and Enum2:

enum Enum1 {ONE, TWO, THREE}
enum Enum2 {FOUR, FIVE}

and I have a method like this:

public <E extends Enum<E>> method (E arg) {
    switch (arg) {    // Here is the compile error -- Cannot switch
                      // on a value of type E. Only convertible int
                      // values, strings or enum variables are permitted

                      // (And of course, all the cases are incorrect
                      // because the enum set is unknown)
        case ONE:
            // do something
        case TWO:
            // do something
        case THREE:
            // do something
        case FOUR:
            // do something
        case FIVE:
            // do something
        default:
            // do something
    }
}

So is it possible to switch a value of a generic enum type?


There is one way to change it to strings (only works in JDK7):

public <E extends Enum<E>> method (E arg) {
    switch (arg.name()) {
        case "ONE":
            // do something
        case "TWO":
            // do something
        case "THREE":
            // do something
        case "FOUR":
            // do something
        case "FIVE":
            // do something
        default:
            // do something
    }
}
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Have you looked at any Enum documentation? –  Aaron Kurtzhals Dec 19 '12 at 18:32
5  
Even if it would be possible, the two enums aren't related to each other. You can't test an Enum1 against a case FOUR or FIVE value. So your code doesn't make sense written in this way. –  Heisenbug Dec 19 '12 at 18:33
    
@Heisenbug, Well, I know. I will not do this in a real project, I'm just trying out the language. Because all the enum types are implicitly derived from java.lang.Enum, so I think there should be some generic relationships between different enum types and I tried that. So in JDK7, there is a way to do that -- switching on arg.name() and quoting everything in case statements (the name() gets a string representing exactly what it is declared in its enum declaration) -- of course it's some trivial findings, but just for fun! –  shuangwhywhy Dec 19 '12 at 21:18
    
@shuangwhywhy: my comment wasn't intended to be critic, sorry. I was just pointing out that. Always pleased to see people experimenting with the language ;) –  Heisenbug Dec 19 '12 at 21:23
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You cannot do what you are trying. For one thing, an enum switch is actually a shorthand for a switch on the ordinal() of the enum. So even if you could get the switch to recognize your "joint enum" type, the statement has duplicate case branches. (For instance, ONE and FOUR both have ordinal 0.)

One approach might be to move the action into the enums themselves. You can then have each enum type implement a common interface:

interface Actor {
    void doSomething();
}

enum Enum1 implements Actor {
    ONE {
        public void doSomething() { . . . }
    },
    TWO {
        public void doSomething() { . . . }
    },
    THREE {
        public void doSomething() { . . . }
    }
}

enum Enum2 implements Actor {
    FOUR {
        public void doSomething() { . . . }
    },
    FIVE {
        public void doSomething() { . . . }
    }
}

Then you could implement your method to simply delegate the processing to the actor:

public void method(Actor actor) {
    if (actor == null) {
         // default action
    } else {
        actor.doSomething();
    }
}
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Good idea, thanks @Ted –  shuangwhywhy Dec 19 '12 at 21:08
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You would need to cast the enum to a specific type before the switch statement (and therefore have a separate switch statement for each type). THat said, this isn't the best of ideas. It is likely that you will find a better solution by refactoring the code so that you do not need to do this.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I know. I will not do this in a real project, I'm just trying out the language. Because all the enum types are implicitly derived from java.lang.Enum, so I think there should be some generic relationships between different enum types and I tried that. So in JDK7, there is a way to do that -- switching on arg.name() and quoting everything in case statements (the name() gets a string representing exactly what it is declared in its enum declaration) -- of course it's some trivial findings, but just for fun! –  shuangwhywhy Dec 19 '12 at 21:27
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