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I have the following code:

info = new System.Diagnostics.ProcessStartInfo("TheProgram.exe", String.Join(" ", args));
info.CreateNoWindow = true;
info.WindowStyle = System.Diagnostics.ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden;
info.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
info.UseShellExecute = false;
System.Diagnostics.Process p = System.Diagnostics.Process.Start(info);
p.WaitForExit();
Console.WriteLine(p.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd()); //need the StandardOutput contents

I know that the output from the process I am starting is around 7MB long. Running it in the Windows console works fine. Unfortunately programmatically this hangs indefinitely at WaitForExit. Note also this does code NOT hang for smaller outputs (like 3KB).

Is it possible that the internal StandardOutput in ProcessStartInfo can't buffer 7MB? If so, what should I do instead? If not, what am I doing wrong?

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any final solution with full source code about it ? –  Kiquenet Jul 31 '12 at 6:36
1  
I run into same issue and this how I was able to solve it stackoverflow.com/questions/2285288/… –  Yonix Oct 11 '12 at 21:19
2  
Yes, final solution: swap the last two lines. It's in the manual. –  Amit Naidu Jun 4 '13 at 20:32

8 Answers 8

up vote 141 down vote accepted

The problem is that if you redirect StandardOutput and/or StandardError the internal buffer can become full. Whatever order you use, there can be a problem:

  • If you wait for the process to exit before reading StandardOutput the process can block trying to write to it, so the process never ends.
  • If you read from StandardOutput using ReadToEnd then your process can block if the process never closes StandardOutput (for example if it never terminates, or if it is blocked writing to StandardError).

The solution is to use asynchronous reads to ensure that the buffer doesn't get full. To avoid any deadlocks and collect up all output from both StandardOutput and StandardError you can do this:

using (Process process = new Process())
{
    process.StartInfo.FileName = filename;
    process.StartInfo.Arguments = arguments;
    process.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
    process.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
    process.StartInfo.RedirectStandardError = true;

    StringBuilder output = new StringBuilder();
    StringBuilder error = new StringBuilder();

    using (AutoResetEvent outputWaitHandle = new AutoResetEvent(false))
    using (AutoResetEvent errorWaitHandle = new AutoResetEvent(false))
    {
        process.OutputDataReceived += (sender, e) => {
            if (e.Data == null)
            {
                outputWaitHandle.Set();
            }
            else
            {
                output.AppendLine(e.Data);
            }
        };
        process.ErrorDataReceived += (sender, e) =>
        {
            if (e.Data == null)
            {
                errorWaitHandle.Set();
            }
            else
            {
                error.AppendLine(e.Data);
            }
        };

        process.Start();

        process.BeginOutputReadLine();
        process.BeginErrorReadLine();

        if (process.WaitForExit(timeout) &&
            outputWaitHandle.WaitOne(timeout) &&
            errorWaitHandle.WaitOne(timeout))
        {
            // Process completed. Check process.ExitCode here.
        }
        else
        {
            // Timed out.
        }
    }
}
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4  
Fantastic solution. Thank you! –  Russak Nov 28 '11 at 23:50
12  
Best example I've seen that redirects both input and error, and uses a timeout period. Also, nice to see someone adding to a question three years after it was asked. –  rsgoheen Feb 7 '12 at 13:33
    
How can I get exit code ? any sample about it ? I get error using process.ExitCode. –  Kiquenet Jul 31 '12 at 7:14
1  
Had no idea redirecting the output was causing the issue but sure enough it was. Spent 4 hours pounding my head on this and fixed it in 5 minutes after reading your post. Nice work! –  Ben Gripka May 13 '13 at 16:37
1  
@AlexPeck The issue was running this as a console app. Hans Passant identified the issue here: stackoverflow.com/a/16218470/279516 –  Bob Horn Sep 12 '13 at 18:53

The problem with unhandled ObjectDisposedException happens when the process is timed out. In such case the other parts of the condition:

if (process.WaitForExit(timeout) 
    && outputWaitHandle.WaitOne(timeout) 
    && errorWaitHandle.WaitOne(timeout))

are not executed. I resolved this problem in a following way:

using (AutoResetEvent outputWaitHandle = new AutoResetEvent(false))
using (AutoResetEvent errorWaitHandle = new AutoResetEvent(false))
{
    using (process = new Process())
    {
        // preparing ProcessStartInfo

        try
        {
            process.OutputDataReceived += (sender, e) =>
                {
                    if (e.Data == null)
                    {
                        outputWaitHandle.Set();
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        outputBuilder.AppendLine(e.Data);
                    }
                };
            process.ErrorDataReceived += (sender, e) =>
                {
                    if (e.Data == null)
                    {
                        errorWaitHandle.Set();
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        outputBuilder.AppendLine(e.Data);
                    }
                };

            process.Start();

            process.BeginOutputReadLine();
            process.BeginErrorReadLine();

            if (process.WaitForExit(timeout))
            {
                exitCode = process.ExitCode;
            }
            else
            {
                // timed out
            }

            output = outputBuilder.ToString();
        }
        finally
        {
            outputWaitHandle.WaitOne(timeout);
            errorWaitHandle.WaitOne(timeout);
        }
    }
}
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A note of caution with the Mark Byers solution:

enter image description here

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2  
This just happened to me, I solved this by giving the handles more lifetime than the process. Simply by moving the using up higher in the code. (I create a new proc in a using after the handle usings). –  Blackunknown Apr 4 at 8:08

I thing that this is simple and better approach (we don't need AutoResetEvent):

public static string GGSCIShell(string Path, string Command)
{
    using (Process process = new Process())
    {
        process.StartInfo.WorkingDirectory = Path;
        process.StartInfo.FileName = Path + @"\ggsci.exe";
        process.StartInfo.CreateNoWindow = true;
        process.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
        process.StartInfo.RedirectStandardInput = true;
        process.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;

        StringBuilder output = new StringBuilder();
        process.OutputDataReceived += (sender, e) =>
        {
            if (e.Data != null)
            {
                output.AppendLine(e.Data);
            }
        };

        process.Start();
        process.StandardInput.WriteLine(Command);
        process.BeginOutputReadLine();


        int timeoutParts = 10;
        int timeoutPart = (int)TIMEOUT / timeoutParts;
        do
        {
            Thread.Sleep(500);//sometimes halv scond is enough to empty output buff (therefore "exit" will be accepted without "timeoutPart" waiting)
            process.StandardInput.WriteLine("exit");
            timeoutParts--;
        }
        while (!process.WaitForExit(timeoutPart) && timeoutParts > 0);

        if (timeoutParts <= 0)
        {
            output.AppendLine("------ GGSCIShell TIMEOUT: " + TIMEOUT + "ms ------");
        }

        string result = output.ToString();
        return result;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
True, but shouldn't you be doing .FileName = Path + @"\ggsci.exe" + @" < obeycommand.txt" to simplify your code too? Or maybe something equivalent to "echo command | " + Path + @"\ggsci.exe" if you really don't want to use a separate obeycommand.txt file. –  Amit Naidu Jun 4 '13 at 22:03

Mark Byers' answer is excellent, but I would just add the following: the OutputDataReceived and ErrorDataReceived delegates need to be removed before the outputWaitHandle and errorWaitHandle get disposed. If the process continues to output data after the timeout has been exceeded and then terminates, the outputWaitHandle and errorWaitHandle variables will be accessed after being disposed.

(FYI I had to add this caveat as an answer as I couldn't comment on his post.)

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Perhaps it would be better to call CancelOutputRead? –  Mark Byers Jun 16 '12 at 20:31
    
Adding Mark's edited code to this answer would be rather awesome! I am having the exact same issue at the minute. –  ianbailey Jan 10 '13 at 11:32
    
@ianbailey Easiest way to solve this is to put the using(Process p ...) inside the using(AutoResetEvent errorWaitHandle...) –  didibus Apr 3 '13 at 16:19

This post maybe outdated but i found out the main cause why it usually hang is due to stack overflow for the redirectStandardoutput or if you have redirectStandarderror.

As the output data or the error data is large, it will cause a hang time as it is still processing for indefinite duration.

so to resolve this issue:

p.StartInfo.RedirectStandardoutput = False
p.StartInfo.RedirectStandarderror = False
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7  
The problem is that people explicitly set those to true because they want to be able to access those streams! Else indeed we can just leave them to false. –  user276648 Mar 7 '13 at 9:58

The documentation for Process.StandardOutput says to read before you wait otherwise you can deadlock, snippet copied below:

 // Start the child process.
 Process p = new Process();
 // Redirect the output stream of the child process.
 p.StartInfo.UseShellExecute = false;
 p.StartInfo.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
 p.StartInfo.FileName = "Write500Lines.exe";
 p.Start();
 // Do not wait for the child process to exit before
 // reading to the end of its redirected stream.
 // p.WaitForExit();
 // Read the output stream first and then wait.
 string output = p.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd();
 p.WaitForExit();
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6  
I'm not 100% certain if this is just a result of my environment, but I found if you have set RedirectStandardOutput = true; and don't use p.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd(); you get a deadlock/hang. –  Chris S Feb 3 '12 at 15:16
1  
True. I was in a similar situation. I was redirecting StandardError for no reason when converting with ffmpeg in a process, it was writting enough in the StandardError stream to create a deadlock. –  Léon Pelletier Oct 1 '12 at 7:29
    
Thanks for that! –  hupseb Jul 1 '13 at 10:05
    
I like this solution! –  kheya Jan 13 at 19:22

We have this issue as well (or a variant).

Try the following:

1) Add a timeout to p.WaitForExit(nnnn); where nnnn is in milliseconds.

2) Put the ReadToEnd call before the WaitForExit call. This is what we've seen MS recommend.

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