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I want to be able to check a string to see if it has http:// at the start and if not to add it.

if (regex expression){
string = "http://"+string;
}

Does anyone know the regex expression to use?

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what language ? –  Nicolas Dorier Oct 27 '09 at 16:09
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7 Answers 7

up vote 31 down vote accepted

If you don't need a regex to do this (depending on what language you're using), you could simply look at the initial characters of your string. For example:

if (!string.StartsWith("http://"))
    string = "http://" + string;
//or//
if (string.Substring(0, 7) != "http://")
    string = "http://" + string;
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3  
May many, many upvotes be bestowed upon you. Sometimes, regexes are overkill. –  Samir Talwar Sep 8 '09 at 20:13
1  
Thank you for the blessing. Yes, sometimes powerful language features are overused. Regex's are not as fast as simple string operations. –  David R Tribble Sep 8 '09 at 20:42
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Should be:

/^http:\/\//

And remember to use this with ! or not (you didn't say which programming language), since you are looking for items which don't match.

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In JavaScript:

if(!(/^http:\/\//.test(url)))
{
    string = "http://" + string;
}
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Something like this should work ^(https?://)

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You need to escape the /s. –  scragar Sep 8 '09 at 19:51
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 /^http:\/\//
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yourString = yourString.StartWith("http://") ? yourString : "http://" + yourString

Is more sexy

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If javascript is the language needed here, then look at this post which adds "startswith" property to the string type.

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