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till then i used to cope, here i'm trying to build my own container class using vector. I need it for my work. I'm using codeblocks 10.05

class myclass
{
    public :
      vector<myclass> array;
      char * classname;
      ...

The problem is that my datum of my class is well displayed on screen if its deleting doesn't occur in the destructor. My function show() diplays odd characters if I delete classname. I suppose it to come from my method to build object and a matter of range when I pass them as argument.

 myclass::~myclass()
 {
    //if(classname) delete [] classname;
 }

And this is how it is initialized in the constructor :

 myclass::myclass(long lvl = 0, const char name[] = "undefined")
    :ID(++ ID_counter)
    {
       level = lvl;

       int namelength = strlen(name);
       classname = new char[namelength + 1];
       strcpy(classname, name);
    }

add_content(const myclass & c) is supposed to make a copy of teh elements of c.array and "push_back" them in this->array I find out per chance that we could put an object with no name as parameter : mycontainer.add_content(myclass(3,5)); it works but i'm skeptic about the scope it should have

> int main()
>     {
>        myclass mycontainer(0);
>        mycontainer.add_content(myclass(3,5));
>     ...

Here is the full code :

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class myclass
{
  public :

   vector<myclass> array;
   static long ID_counter;
   long ID;
   long level;
   char * classname;

   myclass(int n, long lvl, const char name[]); //push_back n elements, lvl = 0, name = "undefined"
   myclass(long lvl, const char name[]); //lvl = 0, name = "undefined"
   myclass::~myclass();

   void set_level(long lvl); //recursive function, go down the tree
   void add(int n); //push_back n elements
   void add(const myclass & c); //push_back and set back the levels
   void add_content(const myclass & c); //push_back all the c.array[i] and set back the levels

   void show();

   template <typename T> myclass & operator[](const T it){ return array[it]; }
};

long myclass::ID_counter = 0;

myclass::myclass(long lvl = 0, const char name[] = "undefined")
:ID(++ ID_counter)
{
   level = lvl;

   int namelength = strlen(name);
   classname = new char[namelength + 1];
   strcpy(classname, name);
}
myclass::myclass(int n, long lvl, const char name[] = "undefined")
:ID(++ ID_counter)
{
   level = lvl;

   int namelength = strlen(name);
   classname = new char[namelength + 1];
   strcpy(classname, name);

   for(int i = 0; i < n; i++) array.push_back( myclass(this->level + 1) );
}
myclass::~myclass()
{
   //if(classname) delete [] classname; //there is the point !
}

void myclass::add(int n = 1)
{
   for(int i = 0; i < n; i++) array.push_back( myclass(level + 1) );
}

void myclass::add(const myclass & c)
{
   array.push_back(c);
   array[array.size() - 1].set_level(level + 1);
}

void myclass::add_content(const myclass & c)
{
   for(int i = 0; i < c.array.size(); i++)
   {
      array.push_back(c.array[i]);
      array[array.size() - 1].set_level(level + 1);
   }
}

void myclass::set_level(long lvl)
{
   level = lvl;
   for(int i = 0; i < array.size(); i++) array[i].set_level(level + 1);
}

void myclass::show()
{
   cout << "ID : " << ID << "\tLvl : " << level << "\t Classname : " << classname << endl;
}

int main()
{
   myclass mycontainer(0); //ground level
   mycontainer.add_content(myclass(3,5)); //the 3 elements level 5 should be reset to 0+1

   mycontainer.show();

   for(int i = 0; i < mycontainer.array.size(); i++)
   {
      mycontainer[i].show();

      for(int j= 0; j < mycontainer[i].array.size(); j++)
         mycontainer[i][j].show();
   }
   cout << "\ncheckpoint\n";
   system("PAUSE"); //press any key to crash!
   return 0;
}

here no deletion of *classname in the destructor, the program rend this :

ID : 1  Lvl : 0  Classname : undefined
ID : 3  Lvl : 1  Classname : undefined
ID : 4  Lvl : 1  Classname : undefined
ID : 5  Lvl : 1  Classname : undefined

checkpoint
Appuyez sur une touche pour continuer...

with deletion and some bad characters show up with a crash:

ID : 1  Lvl : 0  Classname : undefined
ID : 3  Lvl : 1  Classname : ░(?
ID : 4  Lvl : 1  Classname : ░(?
ID : 5  Lvl : 1  Classname : ░(?

checkpoint
Appuyez sur une touche pour continuer...

Process returned -1073741819 (0xC0000005)   execution time : 29.651 s
Press any key to continue.

I tried to study back some principles about arguments and pointers but this language is too empirical and makes no sense. Thank you for helping.

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5  
Perhaps a review of The Rule of Three may shed light on this, specifically for myclass (if that wasn't obvious). –  WhozCraig Dec 19 '12 at 19:31
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2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You have a raw pointer and didn't define a copy constructor or assignment operator. That means you're getting the automatically generated versions, something you don't want. Review the Rule of Three.

Solution #1: Implement a proper copy constructor and assignment operator.

Solution #2: Change char * classname to std::string classname. Now the automatically generated copy constructor and assignment operator will work. Added benefit: You don't need to use new, you don't need to use delete.

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1  
+1 I opt for Solution #2, as well as making at least one of those constructors protected or private. –  WhozCraig Dec 19 '12 at 19:45
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You should define copy constructor.

My debugger raises error here:

for(int i = 0; i < n; i++) array.push_back( myclass(this->level + 1) );

we see here, that new object of myclass is created, then copied (cloned) into array, then original is destroyed as any local variable does.

So, we have two instances with the same pointer: one destroyed, another inside array, created by default copy constructor which copies just raw memory. So, instance inside array is invalid, since destructor was already ran on it.

THE CODE

The following additional constructor will solve the situation:

myclass::myclass(const myclass& other) 
:ID(++ ID_counter) 
{
   level = other.level;

   int namelength = strlen(other.classname);
   classname = new char[namelength + 1];
   strcpy(classname, other.classname);
}

(above is what is called "copy constructor"; yes, of course you should obey "rule of three" to avoid all potential bugs)

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