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I have a class called A and there's a String declared in it. And i have 2 other classes B and C which is inherited from A

public abstract class A {
    protected String ss="";

    public abstract String someMethod();
}

public class B extends A{
    public String someMethod(){
        int i=8;
        return ss+="$"+i;
    }
}

public class C extends A {
    public String someMethod() {
        int i=9;
       return ss+="$"+i;
    }
}

Test Code:

A aa = new B();
aa.someMethod();

A aaa = new C();    
aaa.someMethod();

When I print aaa.someMethod(); - why haven't the strings from class B and C been appended? I want them to be appended. How can I do this ?

share|improve this question
    
@RohitJain typo –  sharon Hwk Dec 19 '12 at 19:35
    
Please post sscce –  Miserable Variable Dec 19 '12 at 19:35
2  
Please post real code. in java doesn't have inherit keyword –  hqt Dec 19 '12 at 19:37
    
Your aa.someMethod(); returns a string, rather than printing. You need to move the invocation in a System.out.println(aa.someMethod()), to see the output. –  Rohit Jain Dec 19 '12 at 19:38
    
I did, but it only gives the result of the Class C's method, and hasn't got appended –  sharon Hwk Dec 19 '12 at 19:40
show 2 more comments

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

/usr/lib/jvm/java-1.7.0-openjdk-amd64/bin/javac A.java B.java C.java Test.java

/usr/lib/jvm/java-1.7.0-openjdk-amd64/bin/java Test

$8
$9

nothing surprising here, B method someMethod() calls B method, C method someMethod() calls C method...

file A.java:

public abstract class A
{
    protected String ss="";
    public abstract String someMethod();
}

file B.java

public class B extends A
{
    public String someMethod()
    {
        int i=8;
        return ss+="$"+i;
    }
}

file C.java

public class C extends A
{
    public String someMethod()
    {
        int i=9;
        return ss+="$"+i;
    }
}

file Test.java

public class Test
{
    public static void main(String pArgs[])
    {
        A aa = new B();
        System.out.println(aa.someMethod());
        A aaa = new C();
        System.out.println(aaa.someMethod());
    }
}
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Overridden methods in Java do not automatically invoke their superclass parents. So, in your C subclass, calling someMethod does not invoke the method from its parent A, unless you explicitly call super.

public class C extends A
    public String someMethod(){
        int i=9;
        return ss+= super.someMethod()+"$"+i;
    }
}

I assume you are doing this to learn, because otherwise this is a pretty terrible way to manage your inherited classes and their properties.

share|improve this answer
    
But the parent of C is class A in OP code. Did you misread that? –  Rohit Jain Dec 19 '12 at 19:46
    
@RohitJain - yes I did, thanks for the catch. –  Perception Dec 19 '12 at 19:50
    
And now you are calling an abstract method. Note that, calling super class method is not the issue here. OP is not printing the result returned by someMethod(), so it does not do anything. So, he might be thinking that it is printing the empty string declared in class A, and not appending the value "$" + i, from class C and B. Funny question this is. –  Rohit Jain Dec 19 '12 at 19:52
    
Actually, I am guessing that the OP is wondering why the strings from the separate B and C instances aren't appended. But barring an update from him I am answering the most 'sensible' question. –  Perception Dec 19 '12 at 19:55
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