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Which of the following is the correct, or at least the best one:

Create a method to retrieve data in controller:

public ActionResult Index()
{
    var list = _context.MyClass.Take(10);
    return View(list);
}

or use context directly:

public ActionResult Index()
{
    var list = MyClass.MethodWrapperToGet(10);
    return View(list);
}

My concern with the first is that the database is too exposed; making it too easy for developers to misuse.

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1  
Depends on your implementation or how you want to separate concerns. The first is good if you're following a repository pattern and possibly using an IoC container. –  Brad Christie Dec 19 '12 at 20:14
2  
Second one if you program it to an interface, would allow for easy unit testing against a mock context separate from unit testing your controller. That's a plus I think. –  Forty-Two Dec 19 '12 at 20:14

2 Answers 2

It really depends on the size of your project. For something small or a quick prototype I'd go with the option where controllers access the DbContext directly.

public ActionResult Index()
{
    var list = _context.MyClass.Take(10);
    return View(list);
}

I personally prefer separating concerts. In other words, I would create a service class that hands the controller exactly the data that it needs. Remember that the Controller should not know how to execute tasks but instead what needs to be executed after what.

This of course, does not mean you have to implement the repository pattern. Your service class could access the DbContext directly if you would like to.

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Ideally you use a variation of exposing _context where you could pass that context through Dependency Injection so you can Unit Test your controller.

Static calls are very hard to test, at least in .Net

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