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I'd like to partition a list into a list of lists, by specifying the number of elements in each partition.

For instance, suppose I have the list {1, 2, ... 11}, and would like to partition it such that each set has 4 elements, with the last set filling as many elements as it can. The resulting partition would look like {{1..4}, {5..8}, {9..11}}

What would be an elegant way of writing this?

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I'm sure someone will post a nice linqy statement. –  Preet Sangha Sep 8 '09 at 20:10
    
@Preet - i posted a linq answer per your request ;) –  Scott Ivey Sep 8 '09 at 20:34

9 Answers 9

up vote 25 down vote accepted

Here is an extension method that will do what you want:

public static IEnumerable<List<T>> Partition<T>(this IList<T> source, Int32 size)
{
	for (int i = 0; i < (source.Count / size) + (source.Count % size > 0 ? 1 : 0); i++)
		yield return new List<T>(source.Skip(size * i).Take(size));
}

Edit: Here is a much cleaner version of the function:

public static IEnumerable<List<T>> Partition<T>(this IList<T> source, Int32 size)
{
	for (int i = 0; i < Math.Ceiling(source.Count / (Double)size); i++)
		yield return new List<T>(source.Skip(size * i).Take(size));
}
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2  
Just what I was about to suggest. +1 for reading my mind. –  LBushkin Sep 8 '09 at 20:25
    
I think the source.Count % size isn't correct - I think you only need one extra set to fill the remaining elements? For example, for the numbers 1..15 with a set size of 4, this would produce 15/4 + 15 mod 4 = 3 + 3 groups = 6 groups, instead of just 4. –  David Hodgson Sep 8 '09 at 21:06
    
Nice catch - I have fixed it. –  Andrew Hare Sep 8 '09 at 21:37
2  
for (int i = 0; i < source.Count; i += size) { /* ... */ } –  Roger Lipscombe Dec 30 '09 at 13:03
    
An unfortunate effect of this method is that the given array is not accessibly by index. There's a method here that returns a List instead vcskicks.com/partition-list.php –  George Oct 19 '10 at 13:00

Using LINQ you could cut your groups up in a single line of code like this...

var x = new List<int>() { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 };

var groups = x.Select((i, index) => new
{
    i,
    index
}).GroupBy(group => group.index / 4, element => element.i);

You could then iterate over the groups like the following...

foreach (var group in groups)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Group: {0}", group.Key);

    foreach (var item in group)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("\tValue: {0}", item);
    }
}

and you'll get an output that looks like this...

Group: 0
        Value: 1
        Value: 2
        Value: 3
        Value: 4
Group: 1
        Value: 5
        Value: 6
        Value: 7
        Value: 8
Group: 2
        Value: 9
        Value: 10
        Value: 11
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1  
Dosn't exact meet the requirements of the question, but +1 for thinking about it a little differently. –  RichardOD Sep 8 '09 at 20:56
    
RichardOD - you're right - I updated the example so that the output is a group of ints rather than a group of anon types. –  Scott Ivey Sep 8 '09 at 21:14
    
I think you just blew my mind. I'm really curious to know where you learned syntax like that (I really like it). All the LINQ docs I've seen are good -- but they don't cover grouping very well. –  Dan Esparza Sep 9 '09 at 20:06
    
Lots of tinkering + reading SO questions. LINQ is definitely one of my favorite new features in 3.5 - and I've learned quite a bit about it just by hanging out here. This overload for GroupBy was something that I hadn't used before - so that was new to me as well :) –  Scott Ivey Sep 9 '09 at 20:19
1  
@ScottIvey very nice grouping logic and perfect for some logic I need for busting outbound UDP commands into multiple packets based on an internal List<>.Count(). good one! thanks for sharing. –  slimflem Nov 22 '13 at 13:43

Something like (untested air code):

IEnumerable<IList<T>> PartitionList<T>(IList<T> list, int maxCount)
{
    List<T> partialList = new List<T>(maxCount);
    foreach(T item in list)
    {
        if (partialList.Count == maxCount)
        {
           yield return partialList;
           partialList = new List<T>(maxCount);
        }
        partialList.Add(item);
    }
    if (partialList.Count > 0) yield return partialList;
}

This returns an enumeration of lists rather than a list of lists, but you can easily wrap the result in a list:

IList<IList<T>> listOfLists = new List<T>(PartitionList<T>(list, maxCount));
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To avoid grouping, maths and reiteration.

IEnumerable<IList<T>> Partition<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int size)
{
    var partition = new T[size];
    var count = 0;

    foreach(var t in source)
    {
        partition[count] = t;
        count ++;

        if (count == size)
        {
            yield return partition;
            var partition = new T[size];
            var count = 0;
        }
    }

    if (count > 0)
    {
        Array.Resize(ref partition, count);
        yield return partition;
    }
}
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var yourList = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 };
var groupSize = 4;

// here's the actual query that does the grouping...
var query = yourList
    .Select((x, i) => new { x, i })
    .GroupBy(i => i.i / groupSize, x => x.x);

// and here's a quick test to ensure that it worked properly...
foreach (var group in query)
{
    foreach (var item in group)
    {
    	Console.Write(item + ",");
    }
    Console.WriteLine();
}

If you need an actual List<List<T>> rather than an IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> then change the query as follows:

var query = yourList
    .Select((x, i) => new { x, i })
    .GroupBy(i => i.i / groupSize, x => x.x)
    .Select(g => g.ToList())
    .ToList();
share|improve this answer

Or in .Net 2.0 you would do this:

	static void Main(string[] args)
	{
		int[] values = new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 };
		List<int[]> items = new List<int[]>(SplitArray(values, 4));
	}

	static IEnumerable<T[]> SplitArray<T>(T[] items, int size)
	{
		for (int index = 0; index < items.Length; index += size)
		{
			int remains = Math.Min(size, items.Length-index);
			T[] segment = new T[remains];
			Array.Copy(items, index, segment, 0, remains);
			yield return segment;
		}
	}
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You could use an extension method:

public static IList<HashSet<T>> Partition<T>(this IEnumerable<T> input, Func<T, object> partitionFunc)
{
      Dictionary<object, HashSet> partitions = new Dictionary<object, HashSet<T>>();

  object currentKey = null;
  foreach (T item in input ?? Enumerable.Empty<T>())
  {
      currentKey = partitionFunc(item);

      if (!partitions.ContainsKey(currentKey))
      {
          partitions[currentKey] = new HashSet<T>();
      }

      partitions[currentKey].Add(item);
  }

  return partitions.Values.ToList();

}

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Using ArraySegments might be a readable and short solution (casting your list to array is required):

var list = new List<int>() { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 }; //Added 0 in front on purpose in order to enhance simplicity.
int[] array = list.ToArray();
int step = 4;
List<int[]> listSegments = new List<int[]>();

for(int i = 0; i < array.Length; i+=step)
{
     int[] segment = new ArraySegment<int>(array, i, step).ToArray();
     listSegments.Add(segment);
}
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public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Partition<T>(this IEnumerable<T> list, int size)
{
    while (list.Any()) { yield return list.Take(size); list = list.Skip(size); }
}

and for the special case of String

public static IEnumerable<string> Partition(this string str, int size)
{
    return str.Partition<char>(size).Select(AsString);
}

public static string AsString(this IEnumerable<char> charList)
{
    return new string(charList.ToArray());
}
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