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I'm trying to get an intution about how MPI works. Therefore I started with a little example:

...
MPI_Comm_rank(MPI_COMM_WORLD, &tid);
MPI_Comm_size(MPI_COMM_WORLD, &nthreads);

int message = 2;

if(tid != 0)
{
    MPI_Recv(&rec, 1, MPI_INT, tid-1, 0, MPI_COMM_WORLD, &status);
    printf("Process %i receive %i\n", tid, rec);
}

if(tid != nthreads-1)
{
    message++;
    printf("Process %i sends %i\n", tid, message);
    MPI_Send(&message, 1, MPI_INT, tid+1, 0, MPI_COMM_WORLD);
}
...

That works fine despite the fact that message does seem to increase above 3. Why is that?

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

mpirun -np N command starts N MPI processes, not one process with N threads. In each process you have variable message and each process has its own variable set to 2. Next 0th process sends its message == 3 to 1st process. After it, 1st process sends his own message == 3 and 2nd catches it...

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The MPI ranks aren't threads, they're - well - "ranks", or Processing Elements sometimes, in MPI speak, but processes generally speaking.

That would normally be a minor detail, but here I think it actually reflects the underlying confusion. If in OpenMP (say) you had the following code

int message = 0;

#pragma omp parallel default(none) shared(message)
{
   int tid = omp_get_thread_num();
   if (tid != nthreads-1) {
       #pragma omp atomic
       message++;
   }
}

then at the end of the parallel section, message would in fact have been incremented OMP_NUM_THREADS-1 times.

But MPI isn't threading; when you launch your program with mpiexec or mpirun, n tasks are launched and each runs the exact same program in its own process -- eg, no shared variables. In particular, each of the tasks will have their own variable message, and that variable will be incremented at most one time in the above code snippet, meaning that message will always be 2 or 3 at the end of the posted code.

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I strongly suspect that what you want could be achieved by the following code:

int message = 2;

if(tid != 0)
{
   MPI_Recv(&message, 1, MPI_INT, tid-1, 0, MPI_COMM_WORLD, &status);
   printf("Process %i receive %i\n", tid, message);
}

if(tid != nthreads-1)
{
   message++;
   printf("Process %i sends %i\n", tid, message);
   MPI_Send(&message, 1, MPI_INT, tid+1, 0, MPI_COMM_WORLD);
}

Thus each process (except rank 0) would receive the value from the previous rank, increment it by one and then pass it to the next rank (except the last rank). For example:

  • rank 0 sends 2 to rank 1
  • rank 1 receives 2 from rank 0, increments it and sends 3 to rank 2
  • rank 2 receives 3 from rank 1, increments it and sends 4 to rank 3
  • ...
  • rank nthreads-1 receives 2+nthreads-1 from rank nthreads-2
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