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Say I have an interface:

public interface Authentication<T> {
   public void authenticate(T token);
}

I have a class called AuthenticationMethods that has several inner classes.

what I want to do is write a utility where I can get all the inner classes, and generate a class that implements the Authentication<T> interface with the Type T of the inner class, like so:

for (Class clazz : AuthenticationMethods.class.getDeclaredClasses()){
   createAuthenticationImplClass(clazz);
}

private <T> Authentication<T> createAuthenticationImplClass(Class clazz){
  return new Authentication<clazz>() {
     @Override
     public void authenticate(clazz token) throws Exception {
        //do something with the token
     }
   };
}

Obviously just using clazz in place of T does not work.

How can i get the type from the clazz in to the parameterized implementation of the Authentication interface?

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why do you need to pass the class into the method? –  newacct Dec 20 '12 at 0:58
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2 Answers

You can do something like this.

private <T extends Class<?>> Authentication<T> createAuthenticationImplClass(T clazz){
  return new Authentication<T>() {
     @Override
     public void authenticate(T token) throws Exception {
        //do something with the token
     }
   };
}

Example

Authentication<Class<String>> = createAuthenticationImplClass(String.class);

or this

private <T> Authentication<T> createAuthenticationImplClass(Class<T> clazz){
  return new Authentication<T>() {
     @Override
     public void authenticate(T token) throws Exception {
        //do something with the token
     }
   };
}

Example:

Authentication<String> = createAuthenticationImplClass(String.class);

The difference is that in first example your authenticate method will have in parameter the Class type. In the second the parameter will be type that class represent.

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1  
I think you mean <T> Authentication<T> createAuthenticationImplClass(Class<T> clazz). –  Louis Wasserman Dec 19 '12 at 22:13
    
No. Because then we will pass to Authentication the instance of class T. OP expect there the class... or not... hmm –  Vash - Damian Leszczyński Dec 19 '12 at 22:16
    
Nope, I'm pretty sure. You want to pass in a Class<T> and get back an Authentication<T>, not an Authentication<Class<T>>. –  Louis Wasserman Dec 19 '12 at 22:24
    
I really must disappoint you again. Thanks for sharing the thought regarding potential mistake, that was caused by vague OP description but my first answer was about Authentication<Class<T>> if you believe or not. ;-). –  Vash - Damian Leszczyński Dec 19 '12 at 22:33
    
Yep. My reading of the OP's question is that the OP wants an Authentication<T>, but if you read the question differently, that's fine. –  Louis Wasserman Dec 19 '12 at 22:37
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If I understand you correctly, you want to authenticate tokens of the clazz class. Then you need to parametrize your factory method parameter with generic Class type:

private <T> Authentication<T> createAuthenticationImplClass(Class<T> clazz){
    return new Authentication<T>() {
        @Override
        public void authenticate(T token) throws Exception {
            //do something with the token
        }
    };
}

Of course at the moment you do for loop for declared classes you lose generic types, so the only way to pass type-safe Class instance is explicit class name:

Authentication<TokenType> authForTokenType = createAuthenticationImplClass(TokenType.class);
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well, I see the problem, but he can substitute loop with explicit calls like createAuthenticationImplClass(TokenType1.class); preserving type safety, but loosing extensibility. Ok, I am speaking to myself. Someone has just deleted comment –  hoaz Dec 19 '12 at 22:16
    
in this case, why do you need to pass clazz in at all (it's not used)? –  newacct Dec 20 '12 at 1:05
    
class is not, but generic parameter is –  hoaz Dec 20 '12 at 1:05
    
yeah, but that generic parameter is determined (either explicitly or implicitly) by the caller. What I am saying is that if you remove it, it will still work (caller might need to specify parameter explicitly). That is, of course, assuming the OP doesn't need to use the class at all in the method (he didn't say, but I actually think he needs it, because otherwise it would make this method not be able to do much) –  newacct Dec 20 '12 at 2:09
    
ok, i see what you mean and agree. this is leftover from original question, can be simplified to Authentication<TokenType> authForTokenType = createAuthenticationImplClass(); –  hoaz Dec 20 '12 at 2:15
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