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I'm having the following interfaces:

public interface IBase
{
    int id1 { get; set; }
}

public interface IDerived : IBase
{
    int id2 { get; set; }
}

And the following (sample) program:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        IList<IDerived> derived = null;
        Check(derived);
    }

    static void Check(IList<IBase> base)
    {
    }
}

I'm getting this compliation error: cannot convert from 'System.Collections.Generic.IList<IDerived>' to 'System.Collections.Generic.IList<IBase>'

If I'm trying to pass only one instance, and not a list, it's working, so what am I missing here?

Thanks,

share|improve this question
    
Isn't base a reserved keyword in c#? – simplyio Sep 8 '09 at 20:37
    
Not a week goes by on SO where someone doesn't ask a question about covariance. – Steve Guidi Sep 8 '09 at 22:21
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You will need to cast the IList items to IBase. Here's an example using Linq extensions:

Check(derived.Cast<IBase>());
share|improve this answer
    
This seems to work only if I change the "Check" method parameter to IEnumerable<> instead of IList<> (which seems to be a similar issue to the one discussed here...IList<> implements IEnumerable<>). – nirpi Sep 9 '09 at 4:36
    
Sorry, still early in the morning... Adding ToList() fixed the problem: Check(derived.Cast<IBase>().ToList()); Thanks! – nirpi Sep 9 '09 at 6:15

This is due to a lack of covariance on interfaces types in C# 3, C# 4 will allow you to specify covariance and contravariance on interfaces types.

Unfortunately this is one of those things that just doesn't work the way you think it should in C# 3.

share|improve this answer

An instance of IList<IDerived> is not an instance of IList<IBase>. For one thing, you can't call .Add(new ConcreteBase()) on it. (where ConcreteBase implements IBase)

share|improve this answer
    
calling .Add(new ConcreteBase()) is not the same as passing a "Derived Instance" using a "Base Type" reference. – unknown Sep 8 '09 at 20:53

And yet this would work...

	static void Main(string[] args)
	{
		List<IDerived> derived = null;
		Check(derived.ToArray());
	}

	static void Check(IBase[] asdf)
	{
	}

One of several reasons I prefer the raw array [] or IEnumerable<> for interfaces both on arguments and return values. But if you prefer using List/IList you can still do the following:

	static void Main(string[] args)
	{
		IList<IDerived> derived = null;
		Check(derived);
	}

	static void Check<T>(IList<T> asdf) where T : IBase
	{
	}
share|improve this answer

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