Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

while doesn't break when i>10 in for loop:

i = 0
x = 100
while i<=10:
    for a in xrange(1, x+1):
        print "ok"
        i+=1

and it prints "ok" 100 times. How to break the while loop when i reaches 10 in for loop?

share|improve this question
4  
Just throw it in a function and return out of the inner loop. –  sshannin Dec 19 '12 at 22:38
    
Why do you use =< instead of <=? Is this a typo or has this a specific function? –  Darian Lewin Dec 19 '12 at 22:40
    
No it's a typo. –  alwbtc Dec 19 '12 at 22:40
    
@sshannin could you be more specific? –  alwbtc Dec 19 '12 at 22:42
1  
Put it in an answer –  sshannin Dec 19 '12 at 22:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Until the inner loop "returns", the condition in the outer loop will never be re-examinated. If you need this check to happen every time after i changes, do this instead:

while i<=10:
    for a in xrange(1, x+1):
        print "ok"
        i+=1
        if i > 10:
            break

That break will only exit the inner loop, but since the outer loop condition will evaluate to False, it will exit that too.

share|improve this answer
1  
Just be sure not to add anything after the for loop or that will execute after the inner loop breaks. –  Matt Briançon Dec 19 '12 at 22:57
    
@Matt Briançon Yes?? I thought while will break as soon as for breaks? –  alwbtc Dec 19 '12 at 23:06
3  
@alwbtc while won't break unless either of these happens: a) you call break while in its body (strictly in its body, not in the loops inside it); b) the body finished executing, and the condition evaluates to False; c) you call continue while in its body (strictly, also) and the condition evaluates to False. –  mgibsonbr Dec 19 '12 at 23:23
i = 0
x = 100
def do_my_loops():
  while i<=10:
    for a in xrange(1, x+1):
      print "ok"
      i+=1
      if time_to_break:
        return
do_my_loops()

where time_to_break is the condition you're checking.

Or in general:

def loop_container():
  outer_loop:
    inner_loop:
      if done:
        return

loop_container()
share|improve this answer

The problem is that the outer loop's condition won't be checked until the inner loop finishes - and at this point i is already 100. From my perspective, the correct way to write this and get the desired output would be to put a guard inside the inner loop and break it when i reaches 10.

for a in xrange(1, x+1):
    if i < 10:
        print "ok"
        i+=1
    else:
        break

If there is some other reason why you want to break an outer loop while you're inside the inner loop, maybe you should let us in on the details to better understand it.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.