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I'm trying to write function which get 2 values or return one value . So when i want use function i got values which are addresses i think

int function (int a, int *b, *c){
    int value;
    value=a*2; 
    (*b)=value/10;
    (*c)=value%10;
}

int main(void){
    int val1,p1,p2,rest1,rest2;
    val1=150;
    function(val1,&p1,&p2);
    rest1=p1*2+p2;
    rest2=p2;
    printf("%d m %d end %d"rest1,rest2,&p2);
}

also i think about return only one

int funct2(int a){
    int array [2];
    int b=(65*a)/100;
    int c=b%1000;
    array[0]=b;
    array[1]=c;
    return array;
}

int main(void)
{
    int a=18;
    int array[2];
    array=funct2(a);
}

Doesn't work either.

So how can i buld function to get 2 values or get this 2 values as one value.. please help

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Your first example looks pretty close, what's the problem? Your second example won't work - you can't return an array like that. –  Carl Norum Dec 19 '12 at 22:45
    
values which i get from first function are to high, ex i should got values from b = 1 and from c =5690 but i got to high numbers ex b 695922 and c 265488. what's more, every time when i run the program i got different values.. –  Matt Dec 19 '12 at 22:55
    
Go with your first solution and check out hmjd's answer. You don't need the & in the printf since, at that point, you're in main. p2 is a local variable there. You only need the & to pass the address of p2 to function(). –  Taylor Price Dec 19 '12 at 23:08
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3 Answers

This is incorrect:

printf("%d m %d end %d",rest1,rest2,&p2);

as the last argument, &p2, is an int* (the address of p2) but the format specifier is a %d. Change to:

printf("%d m %d end %d", rest1, rest2, p2);

To return two ints you could define a struct and return by value:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

struct int_pair
{
    int division_result, modulus_result;
};

struct int_pair function (const int a)
{
    const int value = a * 2;
    struct int_pair result;

    result.division_result = value / 10;
    result.modulus_result  = value % 10;

    return result;
}

int main()
{
    struct int_pair p = function(150);
    printf("%d %d\n", p.division_result, p.modulus_result);
    return 0;
}

If C99 the function() could use compound literal for return value:

struct int_pair function (const int a)
{
    const int value = a * 2;
    return (struct int_pair) { value / 10, value % 10 };
}

See http://ideone.com/8PFtHq for demo.

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In your attempt to return multiple values,

int funct2(int a){
int array [2];
int b=(65*a)/100;
int c=b%1000;
array[0]=b;
array[1]=c;
return array;
}

You are returning a local variable which is undefined behaviour, meaning the program is no longer considered to be valid.

Simply pass an array from main and changes will propagate back to main.

Your function declaration would like this:

void funct2(int *a, int size){ //size is the number of elements

Call from main() would like this:

int a[2];
func(a, 2);
share|improve this answer
    
it still doesn't work, i exactly don't know how use your tip. –  Matt Dec 19 '12 at 22:58
1  
@Matt It does. May be, you didn't implement it correctly. A simple example here: ideone.com/gv4xAi –  Blue Moon Dec 19 '12 at 23:04
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First function fixed :

void function1 (int a, int *b, int *c){
    int value;
    value=a*2;
    (*b)=value/10;
    (*c)=value%10;
}

int main(void){
    int val1,p1,p2,rest1,rest2;
    val1=150;
    function1(val1,&p1,&p2);
    rest1=p1*2+p2;
    rest2=p2;
    printf("%d m %d end %d\r\n",rest1,rest2,&p2);
}

Second function fixed :

int* function2(int a){
    int* array = (int*)malloc(2);
    int b=(65*a)/100;
    int c=b%1000;
    array[0]=b;
    array[1]=c;
    return array;
}

int main(void)
{
    int a=18;
    int* array;
    array=function2(a);

    //You can access array[0] and array[1]
    //...

    free(array);
}
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