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I have a problem with disabling a JPanel from having any methods called inside of it. I set up a Frame with 2 JPanels controlling the graphics for the Frame. The problem is, if I a new JPanel to the Frame and I also remove the old JPanel that was previously there, the paint method in the old JPanel is still called.

Here is the code I used to test this:

The Start class:

    import java.awt.Frame;
    import java.awt.event.KeyEvent;
    import java.awt.event.KeyListener;
    import java.awt.event.WindowEvent;
    import java.awt.event.WindowListener;

    public class Start implements WindowListener, KeyListener{
        public static void main(String[] args) {
            new Start();
        }

        Frame frame = new Frame("Frame");

        TestPanel P1 = new TestPanel();
        TestPanel P2 = new TestPanel();

        static boolean active = true;

        public Start() {
            frame.setSize(500,500);
            frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
            frame.addWindowListener(this);
            frame.addKeyListener(this);
            frame.setVisible(true);
            frame.add(P1);
            for (Object c : frame.getComponents()){
                System.out.println(c.toString());
            }
        }

        @Override
        public void keyPressed(KeyEvent e) {
            if (active){
                frame.remove(P1);
                    frame.add(P2);
            }else{
                frame.remove(P2);
                frame.add(P1);
            }
            active = !active;
            for (Object c : frame.getComponents()){
                System.out.println(c.toString());
            }
        }

        @Override
        public void windowClosing(WindowEvent e) {
            System.exit(0);
        }

        public void windowOpened(WindowEvent e) {}
        public void windowClosed(WindowEvent e) {}
        public void windowIconified(WindowEvent e) {}
        public void windowDeiconified(WindowEvent e) {}
        public void windowActivated(WindowEvent e) {}
        public void windowDeactivated(WindowEvent e) {}
        public void keyTyped(KeyEvent e) {}
        public void keyReleased(KeyEvent e) {}
    }

The TestPanel class:

    import java.awt.Graphics;
    import javax.swing.JPanel;


    public class TestPanel extends JPanel{
        boolean active = Start.active;

        @Override
        public void paint(Graphics g) {
            System.out.println(active);
        }
    }

This program always print "true" showing me that only the object P1 is active and that P2 is doing nothing even though its displayed on the screen.

So what I'm asking is how to make the P1 object stop getting the paint method called when it's not on the screen and have the P2 object have its paint method called when it's being displayed.

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You have two separate instance of the the same class, how can you tell which one is begin called?? (ps CALL super.paint(g)! Better yet, override paintComponent instead!) –  MadProgrammer Dec 19 '12 at 23:22
    
avoid static attributes whenever possible (static final is fine; static by itself probably means bad design) –  tucuxi Dec 19 '12 at 23:37

3 Answers 3

Lets start with

TestPanel P1 = new TestPanel();
TestPanel P2 = new TestPanel();

P1 and P2 are the separate instance of the same class.

The look at

static boolean active = true;

and

// From TestPane
public void paint(Graphics g) {
    System.out.println(active);
}

So, no matter which panel is on the screen, it will always display what ever value active is.

You've provided no means by which to actually identify different instances of the object, so, how do you know P1 is actually begin called??

share|improve this answer
    
I might have not explained that well. When you press a key on your keyboard, the active variable switches states by this piece of code : active = !active; –  Alex Orzechowski Dec 20 '12 at 0:02
    
@alex But active is a static variable, so it doesn't matter which panel is on the screen, they will also display the same value - so how does the OP actually know which panel is on the screen?? –  MadProgrammer Dec 20 '12 at 0:11

Your local variable 'active' in each panel is not a reference, it's a primitive. It's value is set to whatever static value happens to be set in your 'Start' class at the time the panel is created. Which in the code you've shown is 'true' for both Panel instances. This explains why "true" is always printed by your code.

As far as the display problem, do note the JavaDoc for the remove function:

Note: If a component has been removed from a container that had been displayed, validate() must be called on that container to reflect changes. If multiple components are being removed, you can improve efficiency by calling validate() only once, after all the components have been removed.

share|improve this answer

Probably because the remove method of Frame is for MenuComponent. http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/awt/Frame.html#remove%28java.awt.MenuComponent%29 ... the correct way is to add a component using frame.getContentPane().add(P1). Try with frame.getContentPane().remove(P1) to see if it works.

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