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In my script below

def main():
    file= open("NCSIDS_ObsExp.txt", "r")
    for line in file:
        line= line.split(',')
        print line
    file.close()
main()

I get:

['Ashe', '1853282.679', '1673876.66', '1 ', '2 \n']
['Alleghany', '1963178.059', '1695301.229', '0 ', '1 \n']

How do i get rid of the \n? I am very confused with the strip() function. I am getting an error.

def main():
    file= open("NCSIDS_ObsExp.txt", "r")
    for line in file:
        line= line.split(',')
        append= line.strip('n')
        print line
    file.close()
main()
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In the future, you might want to include the specific error message to make it easier to solve the question. –  Darian Lewin Dec 19 '12 at 23:47
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1 Answer

Try using line.strip().split(','), which will strip the \n from the line during iteration. Also, it is usually better to open files with with where possible. This is a context manager that ensures that the file is properly closed when you exit the indented block:

In [1]: with open('test.txt', 'rb') as f:
   ...:     for line in f:
   ...:         print line.strip().split(',')
   ...:         
   ...:         
['one']
['two', ' three']
['four', 'five', 'six']

The issue is that when you read a line, the \n character is interpreted as part of that line, and when you split it is picking up the newline in the last item:

In [2]: with open('test.txt', 'rb') as f:
   ...:     for line in f:
   ...:         print line.split(',')
   ...:         
   ...:                
['one\n']
['two', ' three\n']
['four', 'five', 'six\n']

Therefore in order to get rid of it, you can run strip() on the line itself, which will remove the character from the end of the line, letting you split as you expect.

Your error (in the second block) comes from this:

line= line.split(',')
append= line.strip('n')

You are splitting the line on the comma, which returns a list. However you are then trying to strip the list, which will cause an AttributeError because lists do not have a strip method. Also, \n is a special character that indicates a new line, so stripping just n will not have the effect you want - you need to strip the entire \n character. You can see its 'special' nature if you try to print a string containing the character:

In [1]: s = 'A\nnew\nline'

In [2]: s
Out[2]: 'A\nnew\nline'

In [3]: print s
A
new
line

In [4]: s.strip('n')
Out[4]: 'A\nnew\nline'
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1  
Also note that line.strip('n') is incorrect. You probably want line.strip('\n') –  vkontori Dec 20 '12 at 0:27
    
@vkontori True true, will update to point that out more explicitly. –  RocketDonkey Dec 20 '12 at 0:34
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