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In a simple game (cocos2d) I have a made a small physics engine to move a sprite so that it can jump and stand on platforms ect.

To update the position (vertical movement) I use basic kinematics equations in each update:

  • position = oldPosition + velocity(delta) +1/2(gravity)(delta)^2
  • velocity = oldVelocity + (gravity)(delta)

For some reason the game doesn't seem very life-like. It seems to take a long time near the top of an arc, despite how great I make gravity. If I want my sprite to jump the same height, but decelerate and accelerate more quickly, but still jump just as high as before, how should I do that? I hope that makes sense.

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3 Answers 3

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Problem here is you have made a mistake with your physics! But that is okay, because it is an easy fix.

When calling your update method on your sprite's position, you should first set the acceleration. I assume gravity is a constant for this game, and so you only need to set it once. (-9.81, or something similar.)

You then want to update the velocity of the character in the y direction by velocity = old_velocity + acceleration * time.

After doing this you then update the position in a similar way: position = old_position + velocity * time.

The equation you are using to update the position is valid only if delta is the total elapsed time, and not a time-step! (I have assumed delta is a time step, because that's how physics games are usually programmed.)

I hope this helps! If you want to know more, check out suvat equations, you will see that you can compute a final position if you know an initial velocity and a constant acceleration, where as your game will have a velocity that varies when you do jumping and collisions, and so it does not surprise that it isn't realistic! Any more questions, just comment and I will try to help you further.

EDIT: I reprogrammed exactly what you have done here with some boxes drawn using OpenGL. Your method of updating the position does not seem to work. The boxes only seem to fall correctly if the dt or timestep is 1.0d, and I am not sure why. Then when they collide with something, they stop all together instead of bouncing. I am not sure exactly why.

However, I also have another box on the screen which uses the physics I described: v = u + a*t and s = s_last + v*t The box falls exactly as expected and bounces correctly. Due to a simplification, energy is lost in the bouncing.

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See the second kinematics equation: physics.info/kinematics-calculus My equation is the same. –  bluestunt Dec 29 '12 at 21:59
    
Yes it is, but unfortunately it is not valid for this type of work. –  user3728501 Dec 29 '12 at 23:20
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updating the velocity and moving the object by dt * newSpeed on each update as Edward says, is indeed a more convenient way to implement simple psysics. The calculation with the suvat formulae would be needed to -predict- the total travel, or the initial velocity needed for a targeted jump (e.g make a boss jump and land over the player). –  yannicuLar Dec 31 '12 at 13:19
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But the rest of what you say is not relevant. As you say, you tried the suvat equation in a different environment and you are not sure why it didn't work. This doesn't mean that the equation is wrong. You can use it as long as the acceleration is constant (and gravity is constant). It should work, and it actually really does as the asker says. Chances are that you didn't implement it right –  yannicuLar Dec 31 '12 at 13:20
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Edward is correct. Your forumula, y = y0 + v0y*t + 1/2*g*t^2, is the formula for total distance travelled. You can not use that in a time step. You need to use the differential of this formula, dy = v0y*dt + g*t*dt. This is a property of calculus. Look up "total derivative". Basically, for any function f(t), df = (df/dt) * dt where (df/dt) is the partial derivative of the function with respect to t. –  Sylvan Jan 5 '13 at 11:33

You might prefer to try out Box2d or Chipmunk physics engines in your cocos2d-iphone game for a more life-like effect. Plus, they're relatively easy to implement.

No need to make your own physics system - remember to let the technology work for you ;D

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I did try to implement Box2d. It is a really light-weight and simple game it doesn't need that large a physics engine. I find that multiplying the new velocity by a coefficient of 5 or so helps. –  bluestunt Dec 20 '12 at 1:29
    
@bluestunt: I understand, but I'm sure that countless simple games that involve things like pong have used this kind of "overkill" engine. It just makes your life easier. Better to have spare power than lack any! Plus, using Box2d or Chipmunk doesn't really imply a more complex configuration - if all you need are basic functions, then all you will get are basic configurations. –  Voldemort Dec 20 '12 at 1:49
    
There is no need to implement a physics engine, changing your equation so that it is correct will do the trick. PS: I edited my answer now that I have written a program using your equation and the ones I use. I am quite confused by the results, because I have been thinking about this for too long now, but the long story short is use: v = v_last + accel * timestep to get new y-velocity, then use: y = y_last + v * timestep to get new y position. –  user3728501 Dec 30 '12 at 13:12

EDIT: You don't need to use this formula except if you need to calculate total Distance, or initial speed for a targeted object throw. For timestep usage you could update the object's speed by applying the acceleration, and move the object for dt = the update function's interval. This is a simpler and more appropriate way to do this

However, keeping the same algorithm, you can use a stronger gravity, then a higher initial velocity, to make your character reach the same height, but jump/land more quickly. Using the same formula (dy = a * dt + (1/2)*a*dt^2 ) you can calculate the new initial velocity, as the dy will have the same value. Remember that you want to lower the dt value.

If you're going to need more physics than just jumping, you should consider using a physics engine, like Omega proposed

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Only when i put gravity equal to 800 was the difference quite noticeable, I find it strange why it requires such a drastic change in gravity to affect the object. But whatever works. Thanks! I will looking into a physics engine eventually. –  bluestunt Dec 20 '12 at 1:36
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The physics is wrong, check the answer I have given. This is why it doesn't "feel right". –  user3728501 Dec 29 '12 at 21:31
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The physics is not wrong. Maybe you should read more carefully next time. The asker said it didn't 'feel right' with the old values, and this solution did work. You just proposed another solution. –  yannicuLar Dec 31 '12 at 12:55
    
Edward is correct. Your forumula, y = y0 + v0y*t + 1/2*g*t^2, is the formula for total distance travelled. You can not use that in a time step. You need to use the differential of this formula, dy = v0y*dt + g*t*dt. This is a property of calculus. Look up "total derivative". Basically, for any function f(t), df = (df/dt) * dt where (df/dt) is the partial derivative of the function with respect to t. –  Sylvan Jan 5 '13 at 11:36
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If you use y0 as your last position and t v0 is your last velocity and t as the time since last update it, that update the total distance that it has moved in the short amount of time. –  bluestunt Jan 5 '13 at 15:13

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