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#include <stdio.h>

void read_string(char prompt[], char returned[], int MAX)
{
fputs(prompt, stdout);
fflush(stdin);
fgets(returned, MAX, stdin);
}

main()
{
    char string[0][10];

read_string("String you want to return ", string[0], sizeof string[0]); 

printf("The returned string is %s",string[0]);

fflush(stdin);
getchar();

}

This code is from an exercise I made (modified),just indicating the line of code I can´t understand very well. Its suppose to return various strings within a loop, hence I just declared the STRING [0][100], since its just an example.

Well I understand that the variable "string" gets in the function like this string = returned Then after getting the string from the keyboard (fgets) how does it return to the main(), I mean does it really go back and implicitly do this? returned = string

Also the compiler gives me this message when compiling (although it does really return me a string when running)

[Warning] deprecated conversion from string constant to 'char*' [-Wwrite-strings]

I´m new in learning functions and their structure, I haven´t seen pointers yet,but from what I´ve read so far you need pointers to return strings. Excuse any terrible mistakes and its poorly written code I´m very grateful with any guidance on solving this issue.

The question in here mainly is about how does the string return, without needing to use return, I mean the string gets saved in the variable called "returned" but how does it get out of it, and get back in main.

share|improve this question
    
What is the question? – kmkaplan Dec 20 '12 at 0:06
    
Indeed I did not explicitly asked the question. The question in here mainly is about how does the string return, without needing to use return – Yudop Dec 20 '12 at 0:09
    
This line in read_string() is plain weird: (prompt, stdout);. It evaluates prompt and throws it away; it then evaluates stdout and throws that away too. The code can be omitted without any change to the external behaviour of the program. – Jonathan Leffler Dec 20 '12 at 0:23
    
That was actually an error on my behalf, I meant to put fputs(prompt,stdout); – Yudop Dec 20 '12 at 2:42
up vote 0 down vote accepted

In C you can not really pass an array as an argument to a function. When you call read_string("String you want to return ", string[0], sizeof string[0]); what really happens is that the array parameters to read_string are aliased. It means that if and when read_string modifies prompt or returned the caller’s first or second (string[0]) argument string are also modified. That’s the way read_string can return the string to the caller.

This can also come and bite you, for example if read_string tried to modify the prompt array (as in prompt[0] = 'X'), it would also try to modify "String you want to return ". In standard C modifying such a string literal gives undefined behavior. Many compiler will put this kind of string literal in readonly memory and this will abort your program.

Note that the line char string[0][10]; is invalid as 0 sized arrays are not supported in C. You want char string[1][10];

share|improve this answer
char string[0][10];

declares a zero-length 2-D array. It's illegal to have zero lengths arrays in C.

6.7.5.2 Array declarators

If they delimit an expression (which specifies the size of an array), the expression shall have an integer type. If the expression is a constant expression, it shall have a value greater than zero.

Not sure what (prompt, stdout); is supposed to do.

You are passing a zero length and trying to write into it.


Note that fflush(stdin) is undefined behaviour in C.

If I understand correctly, you want to display the first string in the prompt and read another one and return it.

#include<stdio.h>

void read_string(char prompt[], char returned[], int MAX)
{
fputs(prompt, stdout);
fgets(returned, MAX, stdin);
}

int main()
{
char string[10];

read_string("String you want to return ", string, sizeof string); 
printf("The returned string is %s",string);
getchar();

return 0;
}

Note that fgets reads the newline into the buffer which you may want to strip off.

share|improve this answer
    
It´s only functionality is too display any string you enter in the first argument of the function(in this case "String you want to return ") – Yudop Dec 20 '12 at 0:16
    
One of the main issues I see I´m having has to do with Array declarators, I´ll have a read on them too. Thanks on clearing me some important points on this whole matter. – Yudop Dec 20 '12 at 0:34

I think there is some various issues in your code, that KingsIndian has pointed out. I've also never seen the (prompt, stdout); syntax used before.

In regards to strings being returned. They aren't. You're declaring an array of characters, and then passing a pointer of this to the function_read string. This is writing its result to that memory location.

So your original string (which would be nulls or garbage) is being over-written by the user input :)

share|improve this answer
    
So let me try to understand this correctly, basically the function is writing the result on the memory location I pointed out wich is string – Yudop Dec 20 '12 at 0:36
    
More or less. Arrays and pointers in C are very closely linked. char string[10]; Is the same as char* string = malloc(10); Your variable "string" is actually a pointer to the first character in the array. – user1570690 Dec 20 '12 at 1:10

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