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We have a WCF service hosted as a windows service with tcp bindings on our application server. We have a ASP.NET web application hosted on a separate web server that is attempting to connect to it. Both servers are Windows 2008 R2 machines.

The ASP.NET web application's application pool is set to use the ApplicationPoolIdentity as it's user. When we attempt to connect to the WCF service from the windows machine the following error occurs:

Source Exception: System.Web.HttpUnhandledException (0x80004005): Exception of type 'System.Web.HttpUnhandledException' was thrown. ---> System.ServiceModel.CommunicationException: The socket connection was aborted. This could be caused by an error processing your message or a receive timeout being exceeded by the remote host, or an underlying network resource issue. Local socket timeout was '00:00:09.9980000'. ---> System.IO.IOException: The read operation failed, see inner exception. ---> System.ServiceModel.CommunicationException: The socket connection was aborted. This could be caused by an error processing your message or a receive timeout being exceeded by the remote host, or an underlying network resource issue. Local socket timeout was '00:00:09.9980000'. ---> System.Net.Sockets.SocketException: An existing connection was forcibly closed by the remote host
   at System.ServiceModel.Channels.SocketConnection.ReadCore(Byte[] buffer, Int32 offset, Int32 size, TimeSpan timeout, Boolean closing)

However, when we change the Application Pool's user over to Network Service it connects without error.

My question is two fold. Does anyone know why using the ApplicationPoolIdentity does not work, is it some sort of configuration issue? And, what would be downside of running the application pool under the network service account? I know the ApplicationPoolIdentity has less rights, making more secure, and is considered best practice.

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migrated from serverfault.com Dec 20 '12 at 0:33

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1 Answer 1

The answer to this depends on the different configurations you have in your network, your servers and your service.

I've run into similar situations in the past where the ApplicationPoolIdentity doesn't have rights to 'talk' with resources outside of the machine.

Another issue could be around how do you handle the connections between your web application and the server. Are you reusing the same connection every time, or are you closing / reopening your channels? This msdn thread has some information on this.

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That is a good point, the ASP.NET web application opens and closes the connection each time to the WCF service. This particular feature doesn't get used enough to justify maintaining a persistent connection. It appears the ApplicationPoolIdentity doesn't have the rights to talk to outside resources, just like in your case. Were you able to get that resolved? –  bwalk2895 Dec 21 '12 at 0:14
    
In my case, it was a domain policy that was preventing this, so we switched to running the application pool as a dedicated domain account. Not sure what your environment looks like, but check the firewall configurations. –  Ramiro Berrelleza Dec 21 '12 at 20:28
    
We will have to check that out. Thank you for helping out. –  bwalk2895 Dec 27 '12 at 22:32
    
@bwalk2895 did you ever find out where that setting was configured? –  Nik Mar 4 '13 at 16:38

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