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I wrote a function in a .py-file, in an external editor (PyScripter). I loaded it into the IDLE-editor early, and then continued writing the function in PyScripter, occassionally running it in IDLE by using F5 on the loaded .py (without reloading it in the IDLE .py-editor).

Now then, to the problem. I was done with the .py, saved it one last time in PyScripter and ran it in IDLE. Found that I had to do one last tweak. Accidently did the tweak in the IDLE-editor, which had the old #$$ version, saved it. PyScripter still running. Reloads the file when it notices it has changed on disk. All data gone.

I realized the mistake without reloading the saved .py in IDLE though, so the function is still available in memory. Can I get it back from the IDLE shell? I'm going mental over this...

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I don't know about PyScripter, but I would try a CTRL+Z in there and see what comes up. Otherwise I wouldn't lose too much time on this. You'll probably go much, much, much faster rewriting what you already wrote, so in the end you won't have lost so much time. –  Thomas Orozco Dec 20 '12 at 0:57
    
PyScripter does not support ctrl+z when reloading the source file. I guess it resets the editor history when loading a file. –  matteyas Dec 20 '12 at 3:03

1 Answer 1

You could try inspect.getsource(). It doesn't always work, though.

Example in ipython:

In [1]: import inspect

In [2]: def foo():
   ...:     print 'hello'
   ...:     

In [3]: inspect.getsource(foo)
Out[3]: u"def foo():\n    print 'hello'\n"

In ipython it doesn't matter if you define the function before or after you import inspect:

In [1]: def foo():
   ...:     print 'hello'
   ...:     

In [2]: import inspect

In [3]: inspect.getsource(foo)
Out[3]: u"def foo():\n    print 'hello'\n"

In the bare-bones cpython interactive prompt, it didn't work at all;

Python 2.7.3 (default, Jul 26 2012, 19:08:05) 
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> def foo():
...   print 'hello'
... 
>>> import inspect
>>> inspect.getsource(foo)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "/usr/local/lib/python2.7/inspect.py", line 701, in getsource
    lines, lnum = getsourcelines(object)
  File "/usr/local/lib/python2.7/inspect.py", line 690, in getsourcelines
    lines, lnum = findsource(object)
  File "/usr/local/lib/python2.7/inspect.py", line 538, in findsource
    raise IOError('could not get source code')
IOError: could not get source code
>>> def bar():
...   print 'second try'
... 
>>> inspect.getsource(bar)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "/usr/local/lib/python2.7/inspect.py", line 701, in getsource
    lines, lnum = getsourcelines(object)
  File "/usr/local/lib/python2.7/inspect.py", line 690, in getsourcelines
    lines, lnum = findsource(object)
  File "/usr/local/lib/python2.7/inspect.py", line 538, in findsource
    raise IOError('could not get source code')
IOError: could not get source code

I didn't try IDLE because I basically never use that. I prefer ipython for interactive experimentation and emacs for editing.

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Great to know! What determines whether it works or not? I've made a class, initialized it as b = classname(initparams) and then tried inspect.getsource(b). Didn't work [error said it's not a class/object/module/etc, which seems strange]. inspect.getsource(b.functionname) did return the source for the function defined in the class though. –  matteyas Dec 20 '12 at 3:06
    
Just a guess, but maybe you should use inspect.getsource(classname). –  Roland Smith Dec 20 '12 at 11:03

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