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I'm coming in with a problem I'm getting trying to implement a "two-level" casting.

Below is the simplified code to show what I am trying to do :

public class Array2D<T>
{
    private T[][] _array;
    ....
    public T get( int x , int y )
    ....
    public void set( T o , int x , int y )
}

Until there, no problem.

I'm trying to extend this class such as I could encapsulate the use of SoftReferences in the getter and setter :

public class Array2DSoftRefs<T> extends Array2D<SoftReference<T>>
{
    public T get( int x , int y )
    {
        return super.get(x,y).get(); // get the array element, then the SoftReference contents
    }
    ....
    public void set( T o , int x , int y )
    {
        super.set( new SoftReference<T>(o) ,x,y); // generate the SoftReference on-the-fly
    }

}

Indeed, I'm kicked off because the compiler / syntax analyzer skips the template erasures, then the @Override annotation cannot help me (captain obvious).

I can't figure out how to return a T type from the SoftReference<T> template.

I tried to put in two templates T and U for SoftReference<T>, but without succeeding.

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3  
The term template is not used in Java. The terms generics and type parameters are used in stead. –  jahroy Dec 20 '12 at 1:00
    
What is the exact compiler error message? –  Bohemian Dec 20 '12 at 1:15
    
@jahroy Thanks for the edit and the word, I'm still having reminiscences of my C++ background. –  Benj Dec 20 '12 at 10:22
    
@PaulBellora thanks for the fixes. –  Benj Dec 22 '12 at 19:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The problem with Array2DSoftRef.get is that you can't override a method and make its return type less specific (e.g. SoftReference<T> -> T).

The problem with Array2DSoftRef.set is that you can't override a method if it has different parameters (e.g. T instead of SoftReference<T>) but you also can't overload it if it will have the same parameters after erasure.

I would recommend you use composition instead of inheritance here:

public class Array2DSoftRefs<T> {

    private final Array2D<SoftReference<T>> inner = ...;

    public T get( int x , int y ) {
        return inner.get(x,y).get();
    }

    public void set( T o , int x , int y ) {
        inner.set(new SoftReference<T>(o), x, y);
    }
}

Otherwise you'll have to rename your get and set in Array2DSoftRefs to avoid the name clash - but remember the parent get and set will still be publicly exposed this way.

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2  
+1. OP: Remember that by making Array2DSoftRefs<T> extend Array2D<SoftReference<T>> you are stating that the former can be used anywhere the latter is used (the Liskov Substitution Principle)--which isn't very useful in your case, since you're trying to make the SoftReference logic invisible to the user. If you want to indicate that an Array2DSoftRefs<T> could substitute for any Array2D<T>, create an interface with all the Array2D methods and have both classes extend it. –  Jeff Bowman Dec 20 '12 at 6:32
    
OK thanks ! It seems the only solution is yours : I will create a common interface IArray2D to ensure the erasures of these classes and make them the same erasure. –  Benj Dec 20 '12 at 10:20

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