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In PHP < 6, what is the best way to split a string into an array of Unicode characters? If the input is not necessarily UTF-8?

I want to know whether the set of Unicode characters in an input string is a subset of another set of Unicode characters.

Why not run straight for the mb_ family of functions, as the first couple of answers didn't?

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1  
Do you realize that comparing Unicode characters is non-trivial, depending on the type of compare you want? E.g., you can write ü as either U+00DC or as U+0075 U+0308. –  derobert Sep 8 '09 at 21:34
    
Yes, I do realize that. If it became a problem then I would need to transform the input to one of the Unicode normal forms before the split. –  joeforker Sep 8 '09 at 22:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You could use the 'u' modifier with PCRE regex ; see Pattern Modifiers (quoting) :

u (PCRE8)

This modifier turns on additional functionality of PCRE that is incompatible with Perl. Pattern strings are treated as UTF-8. This modifier is available from PHP 4.1.0 or greater on Unix and from PHP 4.2.3 on win32. UTF-8 validity of the pattern is checked since PHP 4.3.5.

For instance, considering this code :

header('Content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8');  // So the browser doesn't make our lives harder
$str = "abc 文字化け, efg";

$results = array();
preg_match_all('/./', $str, $results);
var_dump($results[0]);

You'll get an unusable result:

array
  0 => string 'a' (length=1)
  1 => string 'b' (length=1)
  2 => string 'c' (length=1)
  3 => string ' ' (length=1)
  4 => string '�' (length=1)
  5 => string '�' (length=1)
  6 => string '�' (length=1)
  7 => string '�' (length=1)
  8 => string '�' (length=1)
  9 => string '�' (length=1)
  10 => string '�' (length=1)
  11 => string '�' (length=1)
  12 => string '�' (length=1)
  13 => string '�' (length=1)
  14 => string '�' (length=1)
  15 => string '�' (length=1)
  16 => string ',' (length=1)
  17 => string ' ' (length=1)
  18 => string 'e' (length=1)
  19 => string 'f' (length=1)
  20 => string 'g' (length=1)

But, with this code :

header('Content-type: text/html; charset=UTF-8');  // So the browser doesn't make our lives harder
$str = "abc 文字化け, efg";

$results = array();
preg_match_all('/./u', $str, $results);
var_dump($results[0]);

(Notice the 'u' at the end of the regex)

You get what you want :

array
  0 => string 'a' (length=1)
  1 => string 'b' (length=1)
  2 => string 'c' (length=1)
  3 => string ' ' (length=1)
  4 => string '文' (length=3)
  5 => string '字' (length=3)
  6 => string '化' (length=3)
  7 => string 'け' (length=3)
  8 => string ',' (length=1)
  9 => string ' ' (length=1)
  10 => string 'e' (length=1)
  11 => string 'f' (length=1)
  12 => string 'g' (length=1)

Hope this helps :-)

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+1 good detailed example! :) –  Shadi Almosri Sep 8 '09 at 21:42
    
@Shadi Almosri : thanks :-) –  Pascal MARTIN Sep 8 '09 at 22:01

Try this:

preg_match_all('/./u', $text, $array);
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+1 That’s clever! –  Gumbo Sep 8 '09 at 21:40

If for some reason the regex way isn't enough for you. I once wrote the Zend_Locale_UTF8 which is abandoned but might be helping you if you decide to do it on your own.

In particular have a look at the class Zend_Locale_UTF8_PHP5_String which reads in Unicode strings and to work with them splits them up into single chars(which may consist out of multiple bytes obviously).

EDIT: I just relaized that ZF's svn-browser is down so I copied the important methods for convenience:

/**
 * Returns the UTF-8 code sequence as an array for any given $string.
 *
 * @access protected
 * @param string|integer $string
 * @return array
 */
protected function _decode( $string ) {

	$string		= (string) $string;
	$length		= strlen($string);
	$sequence	= array();

	for ( $i=0; $i<$length; ) {
		$bytes		= $this->_characterBytes($string, $i);
		$ord		= $this->_ord($string, $bytes, $i);

		if ( $ord !== false )
			$sequence[]	= $ord;

		if ( $bytes === false )
			$i++;
		else
			$i	+= $bytes;
	}

	return $sequence;

}

/**
 * Returns the UTF-8 code of a character.
 *
 * @see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UTF-8#Description
 * @access protected
 * @param string $string
 * @param integer $bytes
 * @param integer $position
 * @return integer
 */
protected function _ord( &$string, $bytes = null, $pos=0 )
{
	if ( is_null($bytes) )
		$bytes = $this->_characterBytes($string);

	if ( strlen($string) >= $bytes ) {

		switch ( $bytes ) {
			case 1:
				return ord($string[$pos]);
				break;

			case 2:
				return  ( (ord($string[$pos]) 	& 0x1f)	<< 6 ) +
				        ( (ord($string[$pos+1]) & 0x3f) );
				break;

			case 3:
				return 	( (ord($string[$pos]) 	& 0xf)	<< 12 ) + 
						( (ord($string[$pos+1]) & 0x3f) << 6 ) +
						( (ord($string[$pos+2]) & 0x3f) );
				break;

			case 4:
				return 	( (ord($string[$pos]) 	& 0x7) 	<< 18 ) + 
						( (ord($string[$pos+1]) & 0x3f)	<< 12 ) + 
						( (ord($string[$pos+1]) & 0x3f)	<< 6 ) +
						( (ord($string[$pos+2]) & 0x3f) );
				break;

			case 0:
			default:
				return false;
		}
	}

	return false;
}
/**
 * Returns the number of bytes of the $position-th character.
 *
 * @see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UTF-8#Description
 * @access protected
 * @param string $string
 * @param integer $position
 */
protected function _characterBytes( &$string, $position = 0 ) {
	$char 		= $string[$position];
	$charVal 	= ord($char);

	if ( ($charVal & 0x80) === 0 )
		return 1;

	elseif ( ($charVal & 0xe0) === 0xc0 )
		return 2;

	elseif ( ($charVal & 0xf0) === 0xe0 )
		return 3;

	elseif ( ($charVal & 0xf8) === 0xf0)
		return 4;
	/*
	elseif ( ($charVal & 0xfe) === 0xf8 )
		return 5;
	*/

	return false;
}
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I was able to write a solution using mb_*, including a trip to UTF-16 and back in a probably silly attempt to speed up string indexing:

$japanese2 = mb_convert_encoding($japanese, "UTF-16", "UTF-8");
$length = mb_strlen($japanese2, "UTF-16");
for($i=0; $i<$length; $i++) {
    $char = mb_substr($japanese2, $i, 1, "UTF-16");
    $utf8 = mb_convert_encoding($char, "UTF-8", "UTF-16");
    print $utf8 . "\n";
}

I had better luck avoiding mb_internal_encoding and just specifying everything at each mb_* call. I'm sure I'll wind up using the preg solution.

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