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I have the following check to see if an element should be considered "hovered over" or not.

I'm very confused because I'm seeing elements set to state === 'hover' when they should not be.

The alert message is even more confusing because it tells that the expression that just evaluated to true is one that shouldn't (if you think about it logically).

if( (ig.gui.cursor.pos.x >= element.pos.x) 
    && (ig.gui.cursor.pos.x <= element.pos.x + element.size.x)
    && (ig.gui.cursor.pos.y >= element.pos.y) 
    && (ig.gui.cursor.pos.y <= element.pos.y + element.size.y) 
    && !element.disabled ) {

    state = 'hover';

    alert(

        'This statement evaluates to true: '

        + ig.gui.cursor.pos.x
        + '>='
        + element.pos.x
        + '&&'
        + ig.gui.cursor.pos.x
        + '<='
        + element.pos.x
        + '+'
        + element.size.x
        + '&&'

        + ig.gui.cursor.pos.y
        + '>='
        + element.pos.y
        + '&&'
        + ig.gui.cursor.pos.y
        + '<='
        + element.pos.y
        + '+'
        + element.size.y
        + '&&'

        + ( !element.disabled )

    );

}

The above code results in alert messages like this:

alert message

Surely we can all agree that 580 <= 60 + 48 evaluates to FALSE, right?

And yet the alert was still called...

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4  
Use console.log() to confirm you're wrong (not alert()) –  zerkms Dec 20 '12 at 2:25
3  
Are you sure they are all integers? Because I can see how the string "5.." <= "6..." –  slebetman Dec 20 '12 at 2:29
    
Is it possible that any of the values in your comparisons are strings? –  Matthew Blancarte Dec 20 '12 at 2:29
    
To be sure, instead of doing + element.pos.x + '+' + element.size.x do + (element.pos.x + element.size.x) and see what you get –  slebetman Dec 20 '12 at 2:30
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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

element.pos.x is a string ("60"). You'll need to convert it (and all the other strings in the comparisons) back into a number.

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1  
If you replace those +s with -s or use the prefix + operator then you'll be good to go. element.pos.x + element.size.x -> element.pos.x - -element.size.x or +element.pos.x + +element.size.x since the subtraction operator and the prefix + operator both coerce their arguments to numbers. –  Mike Samuel Dec 20 '12 at 2:33
    
If this answer is the case, and I believe it is, then you end up with 580>=60 and 580<=6048, etc. –  TLS Dec 20 '12 at 2:37
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