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I understand closures close over the reference and not the value of enclosed variables. That's not my question. I'd like to know how to express (to the compiler) "give this task this value as seen when it was created, not when executed".

In other words, how can I get

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var userName = "Alice";
    var task = new Task(() =>
    {
        Console.WriteLine("User is: " + userName);
    });

    // continues work ...
    userName = "Zoltan";
    task.Start();
    Console.ReadLine();
}

to print

User is: Alice

instead of what it does right now i.e.

User is: Zoltan

I'm trying to avoid

Task.Factory.StartNew((copy) =>
{
     Console.WriteLine("User is: " + (string)copy);
}, userName); 

that forces me to recast every state object (eg. userName) into it's corresponding type inside the actual lambda because the StartNew method interface defines it of type object instead of a generic interface (eg: <T>). The demo example above seems ok with string and one writeline - but for a real situation with a large-ish object and recasting it all across a screenful of code is a bit wasteful (and error prone).

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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I typically simply use a temporary variable for closure scenarios like this:

var userName = "Alice";
var taskUserName = userName;
var task = new Task(() =>
{
    Console.WriteLine("User is: " + taskUserName);
});

Edits:

Another way of accomplishing the same thing that reads a little different would be to refactor the task creation into a method:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
   var userName = "Alice";
   var task = CreateUserTask(userName);
   // ...
}

static Task CreateUserTask(string taskUserName)
{
    return new Task(() =>
    {
        Console.WriteLine("User is: " + taskUserName);
    });
}
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Thanks. Ok, so I guess no way to offload that responsibility to the compiler? I guess user managed task variables aren't such a big deal anyway. –  DeepSpace101 Dec 20 '12 at 19:40
1  
No, there's no way to "mark" the variable in any way to change the behavior of the language. However, you can change readability a bit by introducing a new method (see my edit), which eliminates the awkward temporary (the function argument acts as the temporary). –  Matt Smith Dec 20 '12 at 21:53
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