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The importance of using a 16bit integer

If today's processors perform (under standard conditions) 32-bit operations -- then is using a "short int" reasonable? Because in order to perform an operation on that data, it will convert it to a 32-bit (from 16-bit) integer, perform the operations, and then go back to 16-bit -- I think. So what is the point?

In essence my questions are as follows:

  1. What (if any) performance gain/hindrance does using a smaller ranged integer bring? Like, if instead of using a standard 32-bit integer for storage, I use a 16-bit short integer.
  2. "and then go back to 16-bit" -- Am I correct here? See above.
  3. Are all integer data stored as 32-bit integer space on CPU/RAM?
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marked as duplicate by Matt Ball, Prince John Wesley, delnan, Dante is not a Geek, tstenner Dec 20 '12 at 7:18

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We'll really need an Intel engineer here. –  Mark Garcia Dec 20 '12 at 3:03
    
I'm just guessing but if you use 16-bit ints, you can double the possible number of numbers (16-bit ints) that can fit into the cache. –  Mark Garcia Dec 20 '12 at 3:06

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  1. The processor doesn't need to "expand" a value to work with it. It just pads the unused spaces with zeroes and ignores them when performing calculations. So, actually, it is faster to operate on a short int than a long int, although with today's fast CPUs it is very hard to notice even a bit of difference (pun intended).

  2. The machine doesn't really convert. When changing the size of a value, it either pads zeroes to the left or totally ignores extra bits to the left that won't fit in the target memory region.

  3. No, and this is usually the reason people use short int values for purposes where the range of a long int just isn't needed. The memory allocated is different for each length of int, like a short int takes up fewer bits of memory than a long int. One of the steps in optimization is to change long int values to short int values when the range does not exceed that of a short int, meaning that the value would never use the extra bits allocated with a long int. The memory saved from such an optimization can actually be quite significant when dealing with a lot of elements in arrays or a lot of objects of the same struct or class.

Different int sizes are stored with different amounts of bits in both the RAM and the internal processor cache. This is also true of float, double, and long double, although long double is mainly for 64-bit systems and most compilers just ignore the long if running on 32-bit machines because a 64-bit value in a 32-bit accumulator & ALU will be 'mowed down' during any calculation and would likely never receive anything but zeros for the first 32 bits.

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The first answer seems contradictory to me. You are right that the processor doesn't need to expand a value to work with it. But what are you talking about "pads unused spaces with zeros"? That in fact is exactly how you expand a value. And, in most cases it is not necessary. –  Jonathan Wood Dec 20 '12 at 5:09
    
I mean that it doesn't have to calculate anything to get a smaller or larger value. It just pushes a value somewhere and that value either fits perfectly, is too wide and is partially ignored, or is too narrow and doesn't affect some of the blank (zero) values in the readied space (which is why I said that it padded zeroes). –  rsethc Dec 20 '12 at 5:46
    
Expanding a value involves either zero extending or sign extending (as in the case of signed values). In the case of, say, -1, you don't zero extend, you sign extend with 1s so what you say is not always correct. But, as I point out in my answer, this is generally not needed because the processor can work with 16-bit values just fine. –  Jonathan Wood Dec 20 '12 at 15:13

The answer to your first question should also clarify the last one: if you need to store large numbers of 16-bit ints, you save half the amount of memory required for 32-bit ints, with whatever "fringe benefits" that may come along with it, such as using the cache more efficiently.

Most CPUs these days have separate instructions for 16-bit vs. 32-bit operations, along with instructions to read and write 16-bit values from and to memory. Internally, the ALU may be performing a 32-bit operation, but the result for the upper half does not make it back into the registers.

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What (if any) performance gain/hindrance does using a smaller ranged integer bring? Like, if instead of using a standard 32-bit integer for storage, I use a 16-bit short integer.

It uses less memory. Under normal circumstances, it will use half as much.

"and then go back to 16-bit" -- Am I correct here? See above.

It only converts between 16 an 32-bit if that is needed by your code, which you failed to show.

Are all integer data stored as 32-bit integer space on CPU/RAM?

No. 32-bit processors can address and work directly with values up to 32 bits. Many operations can be done on 8 and 16-bit values as well.

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No is not reasonable unless you have some sort of (very tight) memory constraints you should use int

  1. You dont gain performance, just memory. In fact you lose performance because of what you just said, since registers need to strip out the upper bits.
  2. See above
  3. Yes depends on the CPU, No it's 16 bit on the RAM
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What (if any) performance gain/hindrance does using a smaller ranged integer bring? Like, if instead of using a standard 32-bit integer for storage, I use a 16-bit short integer.

Performance comes from cache locality. The more data you fit in cache, the faster your program runs. This is more relevant if you have lots of short values.

"and then go back to 16-bit" -- Am I correct here?

I'm not so sure about this. I would have expected that the CPU can optimize multiple operations in parallel, and you get bigger throughput if you can pack data into 16 bits. It may also be that this can happen at the same time as other 32-bit operations. I am speculating here, so I'll stop!

Are all integer data stored as 32-bit integer space on CPU/RAM?

No. The various integer datatypes have a specific size. However, you may encounter padding inside structs when you use char and short in particular.


Speed efficiency is not the only concern. Obviously you have storage benefits, as well as intrinsic behaviour (for example, I have written performance-specific code that exploits the integer overflow of a unsigned short just so that I don't have to do any modulo). You also have the benefit of using specific data sizes for reading and writing binary data. There's probably more that I haven't mentioned, but you get the point =)

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