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I have a User object that I pull from a hibernate session. The User object has a Set of Car objects which I which I am retrieving and converting to JSON. The problem is that when I return the Set to be converted to JSON it goes into an infinite loop of parsing it seems because the hibernate session is still active.

The code looks like this:

        public Set<Car> getUserCurrentCar(User user) {
                user = (User) session.get(User.class, user.getId());
            Set<Car> retrievedCars = (Set<Car>) user.getCars();
            session.close();
            return retrievedCars;
        }

However, when I move the object values into an object without a session, everything parses fine without an error:

public Set<Car> getUserCurrentCar(User user) {
            user = (User) session.get(User.class, user.getId());
        Set<Car> Cars = new HashSet<Car>();
        Set<Car> retrievedCars = (Set<Car>) user.getCars();

        for(Car Car :retrievedCars){
        Car newCar = new Car();
        newCar.setTitle(car.getTitle());
        cars.add(newCar);
        }
        session.close();
        return cars;
    }

Though this works, I would like to modify my objects in the future and avoid all of this transferring of objects which seems repetitive.

Additionally, my Car object has a many-to-one back reference to User in hibernate mapping:

<many-to-one name="user" 
    column="userId"
    not-null="true"/>

How can I avoid this, and use a truly detached object to parse into JSON?

share|improve this question
    
What JSON library are you using to serialize these objects? Your Car object wouldn't happen to have a back reference to User, would it? –  Perception Dec 20 '12 at 5:43
    
Yes my car object has a back reference to User. I am using Restlets. I had added what the reference looks like above. What should I do? –  Atma Dec 20 '12 at 5:50
    
Unfortunately, I am not familiar with the Restlet's framework. But the real problem is circular references, which alot of JSON frameworks simply do not know how to handle. If you were using Jackson I could give you a solution, but as it is you will need to find out how this is typically handled in the Restlet framework. –  Perception Dec 20 '12 at 5:58
    
Looks like Restlets supports Jackson. I've posted a possible solution. –  Perception Dec 20 '12 at 6:12

2 Answers 2

The problem you are having is not related to Hibernate sessions. Rather, your JSON framework is having trouble serializing circular references, leading to stack overflows. One solution for you is too enable the Jackson extension in your Restlet framework, then use the JacksonRepresentation to serialize your objects. With Jackson enabled, you can then annotate your objects in the manner shown below, and circular references will then be handled more gracefully:

public class User implements Serializable {
    public static final String REFERENCE_CARS = "user.cars";

    private Set<Car> cars;

    // constructors, etc

    @JsonManagedReference(REFERENCE_CARS)
    public Set<Car> getCars() {
        return cars;
    }
}

public class Car implements Serializable {
    private User user;

    // constructors, etc

    @JsonBackReference(User.REFERENCE_CARS)
    public User getUser() {
        return user;
    }
}

Note that User is the owning side of this relationship, so any cars it contains will be serialized in its JSON. On the other hand, Car is the owned side of the relationship, so a User object will not* appear in its JSON.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

As mentioned in my question, I wanted to simply pull an object from hibernte and convert it to JSON. Since the Car object had a back reference in its nested object to the User object, JSON frameworks like Restlets and google GSON went into an infinite loop.

I wanted to avoid it, but I had to pull the object from hibernate and then I manually looped through the objects and populated newly created objects with exactly what I needed.

This is going to cause maintenance work in the future when values on these objects change, but it does ultimately work.

Answer: pull object from hibernate. Create separate java object. Loop through objects and populate newly created objects with hibernate object values.

share|improve this answer
    
From your point I have to do manual iteration.If so In the complex and critical web application's the more iterations and holding new objects are really memory and time consuming process. Doesn't hibernate offers any better solution! Right now I struggle with the same problem, when my table objects are being marshalled by JAXB for the REST Service. –  iDroid Aug 29 '13 at 5:31

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