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After searching through google, it seems everyone uses text file to show an example how to lock a file using flock()

then i tried

<?php

$dom = new DOMDocument("1.0");
$fp = $dom->load('bt.xml');
//$fp = fopen("bt.xml", "w");
if (flock($fp, LOCK_EX | LOCK_NB)) {
    echo "Got lock!\n";
    sleep(10);
    flock($fp, LOCK_UN);
} else {
    print "Could not get lock!\n";
}?>

but it gives an error

Warning: flock() expects parameter 1 to be resource, boolean given in /var/www/html/testphp/lock1.php on line 6 Could not get lock!

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1 Answer 1

The flock() function takes a file handle as its first parameter, and a lock operation as its second parameter. File handles you know already, and the operations are simple: LOCK_SH requests a shared lock, LOCK_EX requests an exclusive lock, and LOCK_UN releases a lock. Calling flock() will return true if the file lock was retrieved successfully, or false if it failed. So, for example, flock() could be used like this:

<?php
    $fp = fopen( $filename,"w"); // open it for WRITING ("w")
    if (flock($fp, LOCK_EX)) {
        // do your file writes here
        flock($fp, LOCK_UN); // unlock the file
    } else {
        // flock() returned false, no lock obtained
        print "Could not lock $filename!\n";
    }
?>

The file locking mechanism in PHP automatically makes processes queue up for their locks by default. For example, save this next script as flock.php:

<?php
    $fp = fopen("foo.txt", "w");
    if (flock($fp, LOCK_EX)) {
        print "Got lock!\n";
        sleep(10);
        flock($fp, LOCK_UN);
    }
?>

That script attempts to lock the file foo.txt, so you will need to create that file. The script locks it with LOCK_EX, which means no other program can lock that file. Once the lock is obtained, the script sleeps for ten seconds, then unlocks the file and quits. If a lock cannot be obtained because another application has a lock, the script waits at the flock() call for the lock to be released, then locks it itself and continues.

To test this out, open up two command prompts and run the script twice. The first script run will get a lock immediately and print "Got lock!", then sleep for ten seconds. If while the first script is sleeping you launch the second script, it will wait ("block") on the flock() call and wait for the first script to finish. When the first script finishes, the second script will succeed in getting its lock, print out "Got lock!" then sleep for ten more seconds until it finally terminates.

Sometimes it is not desirable to have your scripts wait for a file to become unlocked, and in this situation you can add an extra option to the second parameter using the bitwise OR operator, |. If you pass in LOCK_NB ORed with your normal second parameter, PHP will not block when it requests a file lock. This means that if the file lock is not available, flock() will return immediately with false rather than hang around waiting for a lock to become available.

Here is how that looks in code:

<?php
    $fp = fopen("foo.txt", "w");
    if (flock($fp, LOCK_EX | LOCK_NB)) {
        echo "Got lock!\n";
        sleep(10);
        flock($fp, LOCK_UN);
    } else {
        print "Could not get lock!\n";
    }
?>

This time, the first script will get the lock and print "Got lock!", whereas the second will fail to get the lock, return immediately, and print "Could not get lock!"

share|improve this answer
    
how to get file pointer of a xml file from domdocument?? –  user1400191 Dec 20 '12 at 8:20
1  
forget domdocument, use this method –  Azzy Dec 20 '12 at 8:31
    
@user1400191, read the file and feed it to DOMDocument as a string. Not hard. –  Charles Dec 20 '12 at 8:49
    
@Charles u r right. thanks for the information. –  user1400191 Dec 20 '12 at 9:38

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