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For browsers < IE7, I want to use a certain style attribute, while for other browsers I'd like to use another. Can I do this using a single css file, or do I have to do if then logic to include an ie hack css file?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Here's an example how you can include an IE6-specific CSS to override specific CSS classes for IE 6 or lower:

<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="/css/screen.css" title="MySiteStyle" media="screen" />
<!--[if lte IE 6]>
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="/css/screen-ie6.css" title="MySiteStyle" media="screen" />
<![endif]-->

Alternatively, you can do it on per-element basis like this:

<!--[if (!IE) | (gt IE 6)]>
<div class="header">
<![endif]--> 
<!--[if lte IE 6]>
<div class="ie6_header">
<![endif]-->

MSDN has some more details about IE Conditional Comments support.

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Well you could use javascript to detect the browser and apply a class based on that. For example, see:

JQuery Attributes

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You could use CSS hacks. But you shouldn't.

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+1 you shouldn't –  voyager Sep 9 '09 at 12:58

You could use conditional comments:

<!--[if lt IE 7]>
  <style>
    /*your style for IE <=6*/
  </style>
<![endif]-->

<![if !IE | (gte IE 7)]>
  <style>
    /*your style for other browsers*/
  </style>
<![endif]>

I've found it to be the cleanest solution for this kind of thing.

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Not within "single css file" OP was asking about. –  ChssPly76 Sep 8 '09 at 23:20
    
@ChssPly76: It was an option, not a requirement. But you are right, this option requires two files (I normally just override some things on the IE specific style sheet). Anyway, I still think this is a cleaner approach. –  voyager Sep 8 '09 at 23:24
    
Note that this will create the IE-specific style for all versions of IE, not only <IE7 –  Franci Penov Sep 8 '09 at 23:28
    
@Franci Penov: I just wanted to give him a pointer, but you were right, so I updated the answer. –  voyager Sep 9 '09 at 12:55

You can use CSS Expressions to some extent.

See http://gadgetopia.com/post/2774 for some examples. These don't get around conditional CSS attributes per se, but they do allow you to dynamically vary the values of CSS attributes.

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on the jQuery tip check out this plugin: http://jquery.thewikies.com/browser/

a plugin to do what ghills suggests, this is a nice clean way to go.

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The following page will show you 6 CSS hacks specifically for IE7. You shouldn't use them, but they're the easiest way for getting the exact right look for your website.

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There are easier ways, look at the other answers here. –  voyager Sep 9 '09 at 12:59

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