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This is continuation of My Old Question

This is my function which creates a new student object:

function student(id, name, marks, mob, home){
    this.id = id;
    this.name = name;
    this.marks = marks;
    this.contacts = {};
    this.contacts.mob = mob;
    this.contacts.home = home;

    this.toContactDetailsString = function(){
        return this.name +':'+ this.mob +', '+ this.home
    }
}

I would like to create a copy of the object when it is initialized inside that object: I came up with this:

function student(id, name, marks, mob, home){
    this.id = id;
    this.name = name;
    this.marks = marks;
    this.contacts = {};
    this.contacts.mob = mob;
    this.contacts.home = home;

    this.toContactDetailsString = function(){
        return this.name +':'+ this.mob +', '+ this.home
    }
    this.baseCopy = this; //Not sure about this part
}

But the problem is its giving me a infinite loop of copies of current object in baseCopy; ANd also it is automatically updating when ever I update any attributes of my object.

1. How is this possible such that, I can preserve a copy of an object with the initial values, inside that object when its created?

2. Is it possible not to copy the functions

3. I'm very curious to know if this is possible without hard-coding attribute names and by using pure JS

share|improve this question
    
You don't assign a copy of the object to "baseCopy" there but a reference. No copying is done, that's why "baseCopy" is always "up to date". Take a look at, e.g., api.jquery.com/jQuery.extend to get an idea how to get an actual copy. –  Niko Dec 20 '12 at 9:43
    
this seems to be referring to the window object in this context. –  Stefan Dec 20 '12 at 9:51
    
So, did any of the answers posted work for you? –  Cerbrus Dec 21 '12 at 8:21
    
@Cerbrus: Thanks for wakin me up –  Akhil Sekharan Dec 21 '12 at 8:29
    
Haha, and thank you! –  Cerbrus Dec 21 '12 at 8:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Pretty much like my answer on your previous question, you can use this code to make a copy of the object and it's nested properties, while not copy-ing it's functions:

function student(id, name, marks, mob, home){
    this.id = id;
    this.name = name;
    this.marks = marks;
    this.contacts = {};
    this.contacts.mob = mob;
    this.contacts.home = home;

    this.toContactDetailsString = function(){
        return this.name +':'+ this.mob +', '+ this.home
    }

    // Copy the object to baseCopy 
    this.baseCopy = clone(this); // "clone" `this.baseCopy`
}

function clone(obj){
    if(obj == null || typeof(obj) != 'object'){ // If the current parameter is not a object (So has no properties), return it;
        return obj;
    }

    var temp = {};
    for(var key in obj){ // Loop through all properties on a object
        if(obj.hasOwnProperty(key) && !(obj[key]  instanceof Function)){ // Object.prototype fallback. Also, don't copy the property if it's a function.
            temp[key] = clone(obj[key]);
        }
    }
    return temp;
}

var s = new student(1, 'Jack', [5,7], 1234567890, 0987654321);
s.marks = s.marks.concat([6,8]); // Jack's gotten 2 new marks.

console.log(s.name + "'s marks were: ", s.baseCopy.marks);
// Jack's marks were:  [5, 7]
console.log(s.name + "'s marks are: ", s.marks);
// Jack's marks are:  [5, 7, 6, 8]
console.log(s.baseCopy.toContactDetailsString); // check if the function was copied.
// undefined
console.log(s.baseCopy.contacts.mob);
// 1234567890

(I'll work on the deep copy for a sec)

The "deep" copy should work now.

share|improve this answer

you are not creating a copy by saying

this.baseCopy = this; , you are just setting the reference to this inner variable. So baseCopy is also pointing to same object

You need to create a method which will return a new student object from passed student object and then store that as BaseCopy

share|improve this answer

Well...

this.baseCopy = this;

Basically means that the object's baseCopy is the object itself. So:

var abc = new student(someId, someName, someMarks);

abc and abc.baseCopy actually point to the same object. What you can do is probably change baseCopy to:

this.baseCopy = { id: id, name: name, marks: marks, contact: {mob:mob, home: home}}

Basically manually create a copy of the inputs into an object. Be aware that if any of the inputs are reference types, the copy will still point to the same object as the original.

share|improve this answer
    
You still need the methods. –  Florian Margaine Dec 20 '12 at 9:49
    
He asked if it's possible not to copy the functions... –  user1600124 Dec 20 '12 at 9:50
    
Oh right. My bad :-) –  Florian Margaine Dec 20 '12 at 9:54
this.baseCopy = new student(id, name, marks);

Your way just makes a circular reference. Use new to instantiate a new object.

Using this will probably go into an infinite recursion though.

You can circumvent this like this:

function student(id, name, marks, flag) {
    // usual code...
    // And:
    if (!flag) {
        this.baseCopy = new student(id, name, marks, true);
    }
}

This way, only the top student has a baseCopy.

share|improve this answer
    
This probably won't work. When you new a copy with the same inputs.. the new copy will probably new another copy... which will new yet another copy. –  user1600124 Dec 20 '12 at 9:49
    
@user1600124 edited to take this into account :) –  Florian Margaine Dec 20 '12 at 9:52
    
this way.. baseCopy is still an instance of student, and should have the functions defined in it –  user1600124 Dec 20 '12 at 9:55
    
Yep. Although it looks like OP doesn't want it, I still think it's the best way to go. –  Florian Margaine Dec 20 '12 at 9:56

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