Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to create a class category for UIActivityIndicatorView - I would like to set it in the screen center.

So I declared:

@implementation UIActivityIndicatorView(Normalize)

-(UIActivityIndicatorView *) setAtScreenCenter{
    CGRect r = [UIScreen mainScreen].applicationFrame;
    CGRect wheelR = CGRectMake(r.size.width / 2 - 12, r.size.height / 2 - 12, 24, 24);
    self = [[UIActivityIndicatorView alloc] initWithFrame:wheelR];
    self.activityIndicatorViewStyle = UIActivityIndicatorViewStyleWhite;
    self.autoresizingMask = (UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleLeftMargin |
                                      UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleRightMargin |
                                      UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleTopMargin |
                                      UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleBottomMargin);
    return self;
}
@end

Usage: [activityWheel setAtScreenCenter];

However, I get a compilation error:

Cannot assign to 'self' outside of a method in the init family
share|improve this question
    
Your method should be static –  NSAddict Dec 20 '12 at 9:42
    
@Scar self if ok, in both static and instance methods. You just should assign self in an instance method. –  NSAddict Dec 20 '12 at 9:43
    
what do you mean by static method? –  Dejel Dec 20 '12 at 9:46
    
+(UIActivityIndicatorView *) setAtScreenCenter –  NSAddict Dec 20 '12 at 9:47
    
I took another look at your method, it actually doesn't make sense. Take a look at CodaFi s answer. –  NSAddict Dec 20 '12 at 9:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is not really an init method. Therefore you should not assign to self here. Just skip that line and make the method a void method (no return value).

@implementation UIActivityIndicatorView(Normalize)

-(void) setAtScreenCenter{
    CGRect r = [UIScreen mainScreen].applicationFrame;
    CGRect wheelR = CGRectMake(r.size.width / 2 - 12, r.size.height / 2 - 12, 24, 24);
    self.frame = wheelR;
    self.activityIndicatorViewStyle = UIActivityIndicatorViewStyleWhite;
    self.autoresizingMask = (UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleLeftMargin |
                                      UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleRightMargin |
                                      UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleTopMargin |
                                      UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleBottomMargin);

}
@end

Now you can call it on an existing UIActivityIndicatorView to set its position like you wanted:

[activityWheel setAtScreenCenter];
share|improve this answer
    
But in this case I have to init the UiActivityInidactor somewhere no? So I would rather do it inside the method –  Dejel Dec 20 '12 at 9:58
    
@Odelya Yes, use CodaFis answer if you want to construct a new UIActivityIndicator. In your question you wrote Usage: [activityWheel setAtScreenCenter];, indicating that you just wanted to set up an already existing indicator. –  Hjalmar Dec 20 '12 at 10:32
    
I just declared the UIActivityIndicator - but didn't initialized it. –  Dejel Dec 20 '12 at 10:46
    
@Odelya The normal way to do this is [[UIActivityIndicator alloc] initWithActivityIndicatorStyle:(UIActivityIndicatorViewStyle)style]. Then you can send your message to your instance. –  Hjalmar Dec 20 '12 at 11:01

Your setAtScreenCenter is an instance message. You have to send it to an existing UIActivityIndicatorView. Why would you try to create a new UIActivityIndicatorView in this method?

Try this instead:

self.frame = wheelR;

You may also be rather confused about how coordinates work. The view's frame is relative to its superview's coordinate system. It's not relative to the screen coordinate system. Even if your superview is full screen, its coordinate system will be different from the screen's coordinate system in all but one orientation. You can convert the coordinates like this:

CGRect frame = [UIScreen mainScreen].applicationFrame;
CGPoint p = CGPointMake(CGRectGetMidX(frame), CGRectGetMidY(frame));
p = [self.window convertPoint:p fromWindow:nil]; // convert screen -> window
p = [self.superview convertPoint:p fromView:nil]; // convert window -> my superview
self.center = p;
share|improve this answer
    
I actually want to create also the instance inside the method. To prevent multiple lines. it's a method to set and create a UIActivityIndicatorView –  Dejel Dec 20 '12 at 9:59
    
You would be better off sending the message to an existing instance. As I described, the indicator's frame (or center) is relative to its superview, so you cannot properly compute the frame or center until the indicator has been added to its superview and the view hierarchy up to the window has been laid out correctly for the current interface orientation. –  rob mayoff Dec 20 '12 at 10:01
    
In other words, you should keep this as an instance method, and you should send the message to the indicator from either its superview's layoutSubviews method or your view controller's viewDidLayoutSubviews method. –  rob mayoff Dec 20 '12 at 10:01
    
what is self in this case? the UIActivityIndicatorView or the UIViewController? –  Dejel Dec 20 '12 at 10:05
    
Inside the setAtScreenCenter method, self is the indicator view (assuming you leave it as an instance method). –  rob mayoff Dec 20 '12 at 10:06

The warning is more than just pedantry, the compiler is actually saving you from yourself. You should be declaring a new UIActivityIndicator var to return, instead of trying to assign to self. A better version of the method would look like this:

+(UIActivityIndicatorView *)setAtScreenCenter{
    CGRect r = [UIScreen mainScreen].applicationFrame;
    CGRect wheelR = CGRectMake(r.size.width / 2 - 12, r.size.height / 2 - 12, 24, 24);
    UIActivityIndicatorView *indicator = [[UIActivityIndicatorView alloc] initWithFrame:wheelR];
    indicator.activityIndicatorViewStyle = UIActivityIndicatorViewStyleWhite;
    indicator.autoresizingMask = (UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleLeftMargin |
                                  UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleRightMargin |
                                  UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleTopMargin |
                                  UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleBottomMargin);
    return indicator;
}

As a class method, we no longer have to deal with assigning to self, and you can always be guaranteed to satisfy the return type of the method (if this were a true initializer, it would return id for easier subclassing).

share|improve this answer
    
and how do I use it in the code? –  Dejel Dec 20 '12 at 9:45
    
self.myIndicator = [UIActivityIndicator setAtScreenCenter]; –  CodaFi Dec 20 '12 at 9:47
    
@CodaFi You got a typo there: self.myIndicator = [UIActivityIndicator setAtScreenCenter]; –  NSAddict Dec 20 '12 at 9:49
    
@NSAddict I do? :P –  CodaFi Dec 20 '12 at 9:49
1  
@CodaFi thanks for making me look like an idiot :D –  NSAddict Dec 20 '12 at 9:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.