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The result of running the below code is:

Final account balance is: -97.0

But the answer should be 150.0, right? Where have I gone wrong?

class Account
{
  double initBalance;

  Account(double initBalance)
  {
    initBalance=this.initBalance;
  }

  double getBalance()
  {
    return initBalance;
  }

  void deposit(double amt)
  {
    initBalance=initBalance + amt;
  }

  void withdraw(double amt)
  {
    initBalance=initBalance - amt;
  }

}


class TestAccount
{
  public static void main(String args[])
  {
    Account acct=new Account(100);
    acct.deposit(50);
    System.out.println("Final account balance is: " +acct.getBalance());
  }
}
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closed as not a real question by Felix Kling, Duncan, Headshota, Mitch Wheat, RNJ Dec 20 '12 at 9:54

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

7  
what is wrong in this program code formatting ?? :P –  PermGenError Dec 20 '12 at 9:41
3  
Using proper code formatting is the least you can do when posting a question. Since you want something from us (help), you should make it as easy as possible for us to help you. We should not have to wade through a sea of characters to understand your code. –  Felix Kling Dec 20 '12 at 9:44
    
what exactly is the error because ans should be 150.0 i get it -97.0 y? –  Aditya Yada Dec 20 '12 at 9:47
1  
@user1918213 your current code gives 50.0 if you change constructor than you'll get 150.0. I don't understand how you get -97.0. Are you sure it's all your code? –  Nikita Beloglazov Dec 20 '12 at 9:49
1  
@user1918213 - "... and dont know y but ...". You obviously forgot to sacrifice a chicken before you ran the program the first time .... :-) Seriously, you need to be a LOT more careful with the way that you develop your code. In particular, you need to make sure that you recompile everything that needs recompiling after each edit ... especially if you are running javac by hand. –  Stephen C Dec 20 '12 at 10:12

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted
Account(double initBalance) {
   initBalance=this.initBalance;
}

must be

Account(double initBalance) {
   this.initBalance=initBalance;
}
share|improve this answer
class Account
{
  public double initBalance;

  public Account(double initBalance)
  {
this.initBalance =     initBalance;
  }

  double getBalance()
  {
    return initBalance;
  }

  void deposit(double amt)
  {
    initBalance=initBalance + amt;
  }

  void withdraw(double amt)
  {
    initBalance=initBalance - amt;
  }

}


public class TestAccount
{
  public static void main(String args[])
  {
    Account acct=new Account(100);
    //System.out.println("account balance after deposit 100 is: " +acct.getBalance());
    acct.deposit(50);
    //System.out.println("account balance after deposit 100 + 50 is: " +acct.getBalance());
    System.out.println("Final account balance is: " +acct.getBalance());
  }
}

This is the right code check it.

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Change the code of constructor. This variant is right:

Account(double initBalance) {
        this.initBalance = initBalance;
}
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The problem is in your constructor, try this

Account(double initBalance)
{
    this.initBalance = initBalance;
}

This is precisely the reason why method parameters should have different names than instance variables and also use of final should be favored to avoid such mistakes. If your constructor param was final, the compiler itself would have warned you. Good Practice

Account(final double pInitBalance)
{
    initBalance = pInitBalance;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I disagree with your last point. Having clear names makes it easier to read. After all, you won't be the only one using, reviewing the code –  Adel Boutros Dec 20 '12 at 9:51
    
@AdelBoutros I never said the name shouldn't be clear; I just said that a naming convention which helps you identify a method or constructor parameter helps, look at my good practice suggestion –  Scorpion Dec 20 '12 at 9:53
    
I still think keeping the same name is better with the use of This pointer. I am not saying you can't do it but if I read it, I will wonder why it has a "p" at the start. After all it's a subjective view :) –  Adel Boutros Dec 20 '12 at 12:44

This is not right:

Account(double initBalance)
{
initBalance=this.initBalance;
}

That should be:

this.initBalance = initBalance;
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