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I am having the case in which a function with the following code:

func halfMatch(text1, text2 string) []string {
    ...
    if (condition) {
         return nil // That's the final code path)
    }
    ...
}

is returning []string(nil) instead of nil. At first, I thought that perhaps returning nil in a function with a particular return type would just return an instance of a zero-value for that type. But then I tried a simple test and that is not the case.

Does anybody know why would nil return an empty string slice?

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1  
Your test case works as expected and returns nil. Can you produce a test case which behaves like the code you have problem with ? Chances are you have an error in your logic and are returning somewhere else. –  nos Dec 20 '12 at 10:26
    
I will try to make it into a better test case, but before the return that I believe is returning nil, I have a Println that gets printed, so it must be that return statement. –  GiantSquid Dec 20 '12 at 10:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Nil is not a type. It is a description of the zero value for maps, chans, pointers, functions, slices, and interfaces.

When you put "nil" in your program, go gives it a type depending on the context. For the most part, you never need to explicitly type your nil. This is no exception, the compiler knows it must be a []string(nil) because the type returned is []string.

A nil string slice is a slice with no backing array and a length/capacity of zero. You may compare it to the literal "nil" and can get its length and capacity. It is a []string, just empty. If you wish to have an empty []string that is not nil, return []string{}. This creates a backing array (of length zero) and makes it no longer equivalent to nil.

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Interesting. Nice answer. –  Rich Churcher Dec 21 '12 at 1:27

I believe I know what's going on. The assert library I am using (github.com/bmizerany/assert) is using internally a reflect.DeepEqual.

The return value of func halfMatch(text1, text2 string) []string is always of type []string, but if it returns nil and is compared to a nil value via the == operator, it will return true. However, if reflect.DeepEqual is used, the type will matter and it won't consider both values the same.

playgound link with the test

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I think you're right. As DeepEqual takes two interface{} values, reflect.DeepEqual(test1(""), nil) will result in DeepEqual getting []string{} (zero string slice) and interface{} (zero interface value), which will fail due to mismatched types. –  nemo Dec 20 '12 at 14:34

I think maybe you are being confused by the output of print. (playground link)

package main

import "fmt"

func f() []string {
    return nil // That's the final code path)
}
func main() {
    result := f()
    fmt.Printf("result = %v\n", result)
    fmt.Printf("result = %v\n", result == nil)
}

Which produces

result = []
result = true

So I think the output really is nil

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Actually my assertion fails: assert.go:24: ! []string(nil) != nil –  GiantSquid Dec 20 '12 at 10:42

Go will return an enpty slice if condition is true.

There is a problem with your "test" because if you try to compare [] with nil, you get true. I have modified your test to show you what I mean

package main
import "fmt"

func main() {
    //fmt.Println(test1("") == nil)  
    fmt.Println(test1("")) // prints [] 
}

func test1(text1 string) []string {
    if len(text1) > 0 {
        return []string{text1}
    }
    return nil
}
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