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According to http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.date.php

The optional timestamp parameter is an integer Unix timestamp that defaults to the current local time if a timestamp is not given. In other words, it defaults to the value of time().

However, in definition of time() there is no mention that it's time zone dependent. Which one is right?

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possible duplicate of Does PHP time() return a GMT/UTC Timestamp? –  deceze Dec 20 '12 at 10:13
    
modified the question a little bit. I am asking the inconsistency between time() documentation and date() –  Jim Thio Dec 20 '12 at 10:40
    
@JimThio I've updated my answer. –  Asad Dec 20 '12 at 11:04
    
The documentation seems to have erroneously used the word "local" in the first sentence, and lacks the necessary clarification. It should be worded more like "The optional timestamp parameter is an integer Unix timestamp, which defaults to the current Unix timestamp, as returned by time()." For more clarification, they could have added a second sentence like, "In other words, the date() function defaults to the current local time when the timestamp parameter is not specified." –  paulscode Jun 29 at 16:49

4 Answers 4

time() returns the number of seconds since 00:00 1/1/1970 GMT.

The elapsed number of seconds since the UNIX epoch is the same no matter in which timezone you are.

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No, the value returned by time() is timezone independent:

date_default_timezone_set("UTC");
echo "UTC:".time();
echo "<br>";

date_default_timezone_set("Europe/Helsinki");
echo "Europe/Helsinki:".time();
echo "<br>"; 

Both output the same value.

Regarding your edit, the return value of time() depends on what the current time on your machine is. The current time on your machine is typically set by specifying a time zone, as well as a date + time.

When we say the value returned by time() is timezone independent, we mean that at any given instant, the correct value for UTC time at all locations on earth is the same.

Suppose a person in Japan were to correctly set their system time (along with timezone), and another person in India were to do the same. At any given instant, if they were to invoke time() simultaneously, they would get the same value.

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You need to know the correvt timezone of your machine to get the true timestamp –  dynamic Dec 20 '12 at 10:15
1  
@llnk The question is, "is the value returned by time() timezone dependent?". The answer is, "no, no it isn't". Whether or not your machine has its system time set to 1982 is irrelevant. –  Asad Dec 20 '12 at 10:18

I think the documentation is just slightly vague, meaning "local" as in "of the machine it's running on". Or you could make it to mean that since date formats the timestamp according to the set timezone, the value returned by date will be the "local" time.

I.e., the "local" doesn't really mean anything here.

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It doesn't make sense. Of course local means of the machine it's running on and it's not necessarily the same with greenwitch time. –  Jim Thio Dec 20 '12 at 10:48
    
Well, it works that way though: 3v4l.org/VNtaG –  deceze Dec 20 '12 at 10:50

I think I know the issue.

time() it self is time zone independent.

However,

date() is time zone dependent. How the data is formatted depend on date_default_timezone_set

So, following Asad's answer

date_default_timezone_set("UTC");
echo "UTC:".date(...);
echo "<br>";

date_default_timezone_set("Europe/Helsinki");
echo "Europe/Helsinki:".date(...);
echo "<br>"; 

will produce different value. They both use time

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