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I have been using javascript and I made a lot of use of functions inside of functions. I tried this in C# but it seems they don't exist. If I have the following:

public abc() {


}

How can I code a method d() that can only be called from inside the method the method abc() ?

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2  
C# has classes and Access Modifiers. –  Tim Schmelter Dec 20 '12 at 10:23
    
You can use delegates/Actions. declare them as variables within your methods and invoke them. –  ryadavilli Dec 20 '12 at 10:24
1  
To make it clear: You want to declare the method d() inside the method abc()? Furthert public abc() {} is more like a constructor then a method –  Daniel W. Dec 20 '12 at 10:24

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I wouldn't worry so much about the restriction of access to a method on the method level but more class level, you can use private to restrict access of the method to that specific class.

Another alternative would be to use lambdas/anonymous methods, or if you're using C# 4.0, Action/Tasks to create them inside your method.

An example of an anonymous method using a delegate (C# 1/2/3/4) for your specific example (incl. I need an action that can take a string parameter and return a string?) would be something like this:

delegate string MyDelegate(string);

public void abc() {
    // Your code..

    MyDelegate d = delegate(string a) { return a + "whatever"; };
    var str = d("hello");
}

.. using C# 3/4:

public void abc() {
    // Your code..

    Func<string, string> d = (a) => { return a + "whatever"; };
    var str = d("hello");
}

.. using a more ideal solution through private method:

private string d(string a)
{
    return a + "whatever";
}

public void abc()
{
    // Your code..

    var str = d("hello");
}

Based on your comment for another answer: I would just like to have this at the bottom of the method and then call it from some earlier code.

This won't be possible, you would need to define a variable for your method using either delegates or Actions and so it would need to be fully initialised by time you call it. You wouldn't then be able to define this at the bottom of your method. A much better option would be to simply create a new private method on your class and call that.

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I am using C# 4 so I think maybe like you said I need to look into Actions. Just not yet sure how to pass parameters. –  Anne Dec 20 '12 at 10:30
    
@Anne See my revised answer, you don't need to look into Actions specifically. My code will give you parameters and return values just fine. –  Rudi Visser Dec 20 '12 at 10:31
    
Can I define MyDelegate inside the method abc()? –  Anne Dec 20 '12 at 10:37
    
@Anne The delegate type? No, but it is reusable. If you don't want that you can simply use Func, since you're using C# 4, will update with another example. –  Rudi Visser Dec 20 '12 at 10:38
    
I am sorry to ask so many questions but can I user d inside abc() before it's defined? In other words could the two lines you added inside abc() be changed in their order? I think if I read you correctly I cannot do this. I just want to be sure. –  Anne Dec 20 '12 at 10:46

You cannot declare a method inside another method, but you can create anonymous functions inside methods:

public void abc()
{
    Action d = () => { ... };
    // ...
    d();
}

... that can only be called from inside the method the method abc() ?

The method can only be called if you have a reference to it. If you don't store the reference elsewhere then you should be fine.


how can I pass and return a string to the action?

Use a Func instead of an Action:

Func<string, string> d = s => {
    return s + "foo";
};

The reason I would like to do this is to make my code more readable.

It's good to try to make your code more readable but I think this change will make it less readable. I suggest you use ordinary methods, and not anonymous functions. You can make them private so that they cannot be called from outside your class.

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If action define as global is it useable in another place? I don't think it became like method! –  Rev Dec 20 '12 at 10:26
    
But how would I call this. The reason I would like to do this is to make my code more readable. I have some work that needs to be done (6-7) lines of code. I would just like to have this at the bottom of the method and then call it from some earlier code. –  Anne Dec 20 '12 at 10:26
    
I was just thinking a method or action inside the place it is used would be the most readable. I like the idea of Action but is this the same as delegate? Also how can I pass and return a string to the action? –  Anne Dec 20 '12 at 10:31

It is not the way to define classes, but you could do:

public abc() {
    Action d = () => {
        // define your method
    };

    d();
}
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Use action delegates. More effective than you did.

public abc() {

         Action <int> GetInt = (i) => 
         {
            //Write code here
            Console.Writeline("Your integer is: {0}", i);
         };

         GetInt(10);
}

Action is a delegate so you can give parameter as a method, not variable. Action delegate encapsulates a method that has no parameters and does not return a value. Check it from MSDN.

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How can I make action take and return a string? Is this possible? –  Anne Dec 20 '12 at 10:29
    
@Anne Updated.. –  Soner Gönül Dec 20 '12 at 10:40

Yes, they are called delegates and anonymous methods.

Delegate signatures must be predefined outside of the method for the body to be assigned, so it's not exactly like a function. You would first declare a delegate:

class MyClass {
    public delegate boolean Decider(string message);

    /* ... */
}

And then in MyClass.MyMethod you can say Decider IsAllLowerCase = /* method name or anonymous method */; and then use it with var result = IsAllLowerCase(s);.

The good news is that .NET already has delegate definitions for most signatures you could possibly need. System.Action has assorted signatures for methods which do not return anything, and System.Func is for the ones that do.

As shown elsewhere,

Action<int, string> a = (n, s) => { for(var i=0; i<n; i++) Console.WriteLine(s);};

Allows you to call a( /* inputs */ ); as if it was a local variable. (stuff) => { code } is "lambda expression" or an anonymous method, you can also just pass a name of a method (if the signature matches):

Action<string> a = Console.WriteLine;

If you want to return something, use Func:

Func<bool, string> f = (b) => { return b.ToString(); };

Allows you to call var result = f(b); in the same way.


As a footnote, delegates are a fun part of C#/.NET but usually, the way to control access is to make another method inside your class, and declare it private. If your issue is name conflicts, then you might want to refactor. For example, you can group methods in another class declared inside your original class (nested classes are supported) or move them to another class entirely.

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I need an action that can take a string parameter and return a string? I am confused about how I could do this? –  Anne Dec 20 '12 at 10:28
    
@Anne, that's called a function. –  Superbest Dec 20 '12 at 10:29
    
But can I have a function inside a method. Sorry if this sounds like a not good question but I am confused about the difference. –  Anne Dec 20 '12 at 10:32
    
How can I get the return value from inputs? Do I just do return and it's available? –  Anne Dec 20 '12 at 10:34
    
@Anne, that's alright, I should have explained better (and made a mistake as well, now corrected). A System.Action is any method which can take 0 or more parameters and returns nothing. A System.Func is any method which can take 0 or more parameters, and returns something. These are delegates, or data types for holding function handles. –  Superbest Dec 20 '12 at 10:34

You can use action delegates

public abc() {

         Action action = () => 
         {
            //Your code here
         }

         action();
}

Edit: To pass parameter

public abc() {

   Action <string>action = (str) =>
        {
            //Your code here                
        };
}   
action("hello");

Using Func to return a value

public void abc() {  

    Func<string, string> func = (str) => { return "You sent " + str; };
    string str = func("hello");
}
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Can you show me how I could make action take a string parameter and return a string? I am confused about how I could do this? –  Anne Dec 20 '12 at 10:28
    
I have updated my answer to show you have to pass parameter –  Adil Dec 20 '12 at 10:36
    
Can I place the call to action("hello") just after the first line of abc() ? –  Anne Dec 20 '12 at 10:39
    
No, you can not call it before you delare it. Just like local variable declartions you have to declare them before you use. –  Adil Dec 20 '12 at 10:46

You CAN create a nested class:

public class ContainingClass
{
    public static class NestedClass
    {
        public static void Method2()
        {
        } 

        public static void Method3()
        {
        }
    }
}

Then yu can call:

ContainingClass.NestedClass.Method2();

or

ContainingClass.NestedClass.Method3();

I wouldn't recommend this though. Usually it's a bad idea to have public nested types.

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