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I have function to convert an integer into byte array (for iPhone). To add dynamicity I have allocate the array using malloc. But I think this will leak memory. What's best way to manage this memory,

+ (unsigned char *) intToByteArray:(int)num{
    unsigned char * arr = (unsigned char *) 
                          malloc(sizeof(num) * sizeof(unsigned char));
    for (int i = sizeof(num) - 1 ; i >= 0; i --) {
        arr[i] = num & 0xFF;
        num = num >> 8;
    }
    return arr;
}

When calling,

int x = 500;
unsigned char * bytes = [Util intToByteArray:x];

I want to avoid the call free(bytes) since, the calling function do not know or explicitly knows, the memory is allocated and not freed.

share|improve this question
    
Release it at the end by free()? – Jakub Zaverka Dec 20 '12 at 10:32
    
The problem with this approach is that the caller of the function will not know whether to free the pointer returned or not, without looking at the implementation or comments. That's probably why OP is asking for alternative. – nhahtdh Dec 20 '12 at 10:38
    
use NSData to wrap the bytes – Daij-Djan Dec 20 '12 at 10:43
up vote 3 down vote accepted

A few things:

  1. The char type (and signed char and unsigned char) all have a size of 1 by definition, so sizeof(unsigned char) is unnecessary.

  2. It looks like you just want to get the byte representation of an int object, if this is the case, it is not necessary to allocate more space for it, simply take the address of the int and cast it to a pointer to unsigned char *. If the byte order is wrong you can use the NSSwapInt function to swap the order of the bytes in the int and then take the address and cast to unsigned char *. For example:

    int someInt = 0x12345678;
    unsigned char *bytes = (unsigned char *) &someInt;
    

    This cast is legal and reading from bytes is legal up until sizeof(int) bytes are read. This is accessing the “object representation”.

  3. If you insist on using malloc, then you simply need to pass the buffer to free when you are done, as in:

    free(bytes);
    
  4. The name of your method does not imply the correct ownership of the returned buffer. If your method returns something that the caller is responsible for freeing, it is conventional to name the method using new, copy, or sometimes create. A more suitable name would be copyBytesFromInt: or something similar. Otherwise you could have the method accept a pre-allocated buffer and call the method getBytes:fromInt:, for example:

    + (void) getBytes:(unsigned char *) bytes fromInt:(int) num
    {
        for (int i = sizeof(num) - 1 ; i >= 0; i --) {
            bytes[i] = num & 0xFF;
            num = num >> 8;
        }
    }
    
  5. You could wrap your bytes into a NSData instance:

    NSData *data = [NSData dataWithBytesNoCopy:bytes length:sizeof(num) freeWhenDone:YES];
    

    Make sure your method follows the usual object ownership rules.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I needed this function since iOS stores LSB in the first bytes for long/int numbers. data = [NSData dataWithBytes:&l length:8]; returns the wrong order of bytes that I need. But I did not know the NSSwapInt/Long functions. Thanks for the tips. That will solve my problem. Then I do not need to write any function to convert the int/long to bytes. – karim Dec 20 '12 at 11:40

Just call free(bytes); when you are done with the bytes (either at the end of method or in dealloc of the class)


since you want to avoid the free call, you could wrap your byte[] in a NSData object:

NSData *d = [NSData dataWithBytesNoCopy:bytes length:num freeWhenDone:YES];

share|improve this answer
    
I want to avoid the call free(bytes) since, the calling function do not know or explicitly knows, the memory is allocated and not freed. – karim Dec 20 '12 at 10:37
    
ah ok, you should have said that :P ill edit my answer, wrap the pointer in an NSdata – Daij-Djan Dec 20 '12 at 10:40
    
Probably, that's the only way, (wrapping it in NSData). More object oriented :) – karim Dec 20 '12 at 10:46

The conventional way of handling this is for the caller to pass in an allocated byte buffer. That way the caller is responsible for freeing it. Something like:

int x = 500;
char *buffer = malloc(x * sizeof(char));
[Util int:x toByteArray:buffer];
…
free(buffer);

I would also consider creating an NSData to hold the bytes, this would take care of memory management for you, while still allowing you to alter the byte buffer:

+ (NSData *) intToByteArray:(int)num {
    unsigned char * arr = (unsigned char *) 
                          malloc(sizeof(num) * sizeof(unsigned char));
    for (int i = sizeof(num) - 1 ; i >= 0; i --) {
        arr[i] = num & 0xFF;
        num = num >> 8;
    }

    return [NSData dataWithBytesNoCopy:arr length:num freeWhenDone:YES];
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I prefer the 2nd way. More OOP... – karim Dec 20 '12 at 10:49

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