Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking to count the number of dates covered (inclusive) between two DateTimes.

This is not .TotalDays as periods less than 24 hours may still return "2" by overlapping two different days. Likewise, two dates minutes apart should still return "1".

For example:

2012-2-1 14:00 to 2012-2-2 23:00 -> 2 (1st and 2nd Feb)
2012-2-1 14:00 to 2012-2-2 10:00 -> 2 (1st and 2nd Feb)
2012-2-1 23:00 to 2012-2-2 00:00 -> 2 (1st and 2nd Feb)
2012-2-1 23:00 to 2012-2-3 00:00 -> 3 (1st, 2nd, 3rd Feb)
2012-2-1 14:00 to 2012-2-1 15:00 -> 1 (1st Feb)
2012-2-1 14:00 to 2012-2-1 14:00 -> 1 (1st Feb)
2012-1-1 00:00 to 2012-12-31 23:59 -> 366 (All of 2012)

I can get this functionality with the code below:

DateTime dt1 = new DateTime(2000,1,2,12,00,00);
DateTime dt2 = new DateTime(2000,1,3,03,00,00);

int count = 0;
for (DateTime date = dt1; date.Date <= dt2.Date; date = date.AddDays(1))
    count++;

return count;

Is there a better way?

share|improve this question
    
What about d1.Date.Subtract(d2.Date).TotalDays + 1 –  astander Dec 20 '12 at 11:01
    
Not sure how it's a duplicate. Two dates on the same day should still return 1. A period less than 24 hours crossing two days should return two days. –  Matt Mitchell Dec 20 '12 at 11:03
1  
NodaTime is great for this sort of thing, refer to: [How to use NodaTime to calculate an inclusive days period][1] [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/10336863/… –  Chris Fulstow Dec 20 '12 at 11:04
    
This is not a duplicate as evidenced by the fact it has a different answer from the nominated duplicate... –  Matt Mitchell Dec 21 '12 at 2:55
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Why not just:

int count = dt1.Date.Subtract(dt2.Date).Duration().Days + 1;

Using .Date normalizes the Date to midnight (0:00), add 1 to the Days to get the number of different dates, not just the number of days in between.

Using Duration makes sure you always get a positive answer.

share|improve this answer
    
That'll do it. Will accept when I can. I didn't notice that it was always off by 1 for all tests so good spot. –  Matt Mitchell Dec 20 '12 at 11:10
    
Good add on the Duration. –  Matt Mitchell Dec 20 '12 at 11:13
1  
You can use a minus rather than .Subtract to simplify it a bit (as per @Tim Schmelter's answer) –  Matt Mitchell Dec 20 '12 at 11:21
2  
@MattMitchell Yes, it's a question of preference, I like using Subtract when I'm chaining like this. –  Davio Dec 20 '12 at 11:22
    
Incidentally, your Duration() should be a method call not a property. It actually handles misordered dates which my original sample doesn't. –  Matt Mitchell Dec 20 '12 at 11:23
add comment

Perhaps simply

TimeSpan duration = dt2.Date - dt1.Date;
int days = duration.Days + 1;

Demo

share|improve this answer
    
Yep this does it, +1. Davio beat you to the punch unfortunately for accepted. –  Matt Mitchell Dec 20 '12 at 11:09
    
@MattMitchell: But i would use TimeSpan.Days anyway instead of TotalDays since you don't want to count fractions of days(double) but just the days component(int). –  Tim Schmelter Dec 20 '12 at 11:13
    
It won't matter given its using .Date but you're right. –  Matt Mitchell Dec 20 '12 at 11:21
1  
@MattMitchell: I see that Davio has also changed it so my argument is pointless anyway ;) –  Tim Schmelter Dec 20 '12 at 11:23
    
Yeah. If it was a breaking point I would have changed the accepted answer but it functionally didn't matter. Thanks for the help. –  Matt Mitchell Dec 20 '12 at 11:25
add comment
DateTime d1=DateTime.MinValue;
DateTime d2=DateTime.MaxValue;
TimeSpan span=d2-d1;
int counter = span.Days + 1;
share|improve this answer
    
Won't work for values on the same day. –  Matt Mitchell Dec 20 '12 at 11:06
    
means u also wants to calculate months also –  Nipun Gogia Dec 20 '12 at 11:07
add comment

Math.Ceiling((d2 - d1.Date).TotalDays)

Tried all cases you mentioned. And results are expected! Hope it helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Good effort but it won't handle 2000/1/1 23:00 to 2000/1/2 00:00 (it returns 1 and should be 2 as there are 2 dates there). See @Davio's accepted answer for a working solution. –  Matt Mitchell Dec 20 '12 at 11:25
1  
@MattMitchell This demonstrates that mathematically "taking Ceiling" is not the same as "taking Floor and adding 1". The latter would give a correct behavior. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Dec 21 '12 at 19:28
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.