Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm new to Guice, so excuse me if this is a dumb question, but I'm finding it quite frustrating.

In my module I construct an object which is a member of a framework that I do not control. I then bind that instance so that I can access it later with injector.getInstance(FrameworkClass.class);

When I construct that object, I want to use one of my own objects which itself is annotated to be injected by constructor.

i.e.

public class MyClass { 
    OtherClass dependency;

    @Inject
    Public MyClass(OtherClass dependency) {
       ....
    }
}

public class AModule extends AbstractModule {

    protected void configure() {
        MyClass frameworkDependency = ???
        FrameworkClass fc = new FrameworkClass(frameworkDependency);
        bind(FrameworkClass.class).toInstance(fc);
    }
}

In this example OtherClass is just a simple class with no annotations but a default empty constructor, so Guice should just new one up and provide it to MyClass constructor as far as I understand.

My question is How do I get access to a new instance of MyClass in my module so that I can provide it to the framework class?

Previously I had my own class injected via Field Injection, so it looked like this:

public class MyClass { 

    @Inject
    OtherClass dependency;      
}

public class AModule extends AbstractModule {

    protected void configure() {
        MyClass frameworkDependency = new MyClass();
        requestInjection(frameworkDependency);
        FrameworkClass fc = new FrameworkClass(frameworkDependency);
        bind(FrameworkClass.class).toInstance(fc);
    }
}

I would prefer to keep MyClass as constructor injected if possible.

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you use a @Provides method, as in your answer, every parameter will be resolved through the injector--including dependencies that use binding annotations, and including parameters of type Provider<MyClass> instead of just MyClass. Injecting Providers is the best way to retrieve multiple instances of a dependency in one class.

@Provides FrameworkClass provideFrameworkClass(
    Dependency1 dep1, Provider<Dependency2> dep2Provider) {
  return new FrameworkClass(dep1, dep2Provider.get(), dep2Provider.get());
}

If all of your bindings can be found through Guice, you can more-or-less externally mark a constructor with @Inject by using a toConstructor binding. Note that the Guice docs actually prefer the @Provides technique over this technique, since getting Constructors reflectively is inherently more fragile than relying on your compiler. It may be a good option if you have a long parameter list, though.

Finally, if your @Provides method is big enough (or has complex-enough logic) to merit its own class, you can always create your own implementation of Provider<FrameworkClass>--complete with as much @Injection as you'd like--and implement the creation manually (bound through bind(FrameworkClass.class).toProvider(FrameworkClassProvider.class).

share|improve this answer
add comment

So I found the answer my own question (in its simplest form):

By moving the configuration of the Framework Object into a Provides method I can pass the MyClass object in as a parameter to the method and Guice handles in the instantiation of that parameter, ala:

@Provides
@Singleton
FrameworkClass provideFrameworkClass(MyClass dependency) {
    return new FrameworkClass(frameworkDependency);
}

But that begs the question what happens in the more complex case, what if my framework didn't take a single dependency, but n of them (say it's a dispatcher taking a bunch of actions), I can't just extend my provideFrameworkClass method to take n+ parameters?

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.