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i have a text file which looks like this :

Flooding refers to all water that overflows a node, whether it ponds or not.
  --------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Total   Maximum
                                 Maximum   Time of Max       Flood    Ponded
                        Hours       Rate    Occurrence      Volume     Depth
  Node                 Flooded       CMS   days hr:min    10^6 ltr    Meters
  --------------------------------------------------------------------------
   1064                  0.15     0.000      0  00 00       0.000      0.35
   1065                  0.25     0.078      0  00 09       0.049      0.41
   1130                  0.25     0.626      0  00 00       0.106      0.90
   1155                  0.24     0.098      0  00 07       0.073      0.61
   1173                  0.25     0.106      0  00 15       0.022      0.76

i want to copy the numerical columns (no text) such that the resulting file is like as such :

   1064                  0.15     0.000      0  00 00       0.000      0.35
   1065                  0.25     0.078      0  00 09       0.049      0.41
   1130                  0.25     0.626      0  00 00       0.106      0.90
   1155                  0.24     0.098      0  00 07       0.073      0.61
   1173                  0.25     0.106      0  00 15       0.022      0.76

Till now i have managed to do this code in C :

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<string.h>

void main()
{
FILE *fs,*ft;
int ch;
int c;
fs=fopen("node.txt","r");
if (fs=NULL)
{
    puts("cannot open source file");
    exit(0);
}
ft=fopen("new_node.txt","w");
do
{
   ch=fgetc(fs);
   if (ch=EOF)
   break;
   else
   {
    if (ch>0)
    fputc(ch,ft);
   }
     ch++;
}
  while(1);
  fclose(fs);
  fclose(ft);
  return 0;
}

The problem is that nothing is coming out of it. Can anyone help in this regard and provide a working code.

share|improve this question
    
I would use other tools than C to perform this task, like awk (or perl, or python) –  bernard paulus Dec 20 '12 at 11:30
    
actually i have no knowledge of perl or python . Thats why iwas trying for C. Is it possible it DOS program? –  krishcal23 Dec 20 '12 at 11:35
    
added some solution below, in both languages. If you don't know them, learn them! It's worth the time. Furthermore, imho python is easy to pick up –  bernard paulus Dec 27 '12 at 17:28

3 Answers 3

Your data is obviously line-oriented; it makes no sense to read/write this data one character at a time.

Read a full line into a suitably-sized buffer (1024 bytes, maybe) using fgets(). Inspect the line, do determine if it's one you want to keep. If so, write ut out using fputs().

share|improve this answer

if (fs=NULL) assigns NULL to fs rather than comparing them. Use == to test for equality instead i.e. if (fs==NULL)

The same applies to if (ch=EOF) later in your code.

Note that compiling with warnings enabled would probably have pointed out this assignment in a conditional expression.

These changes will let you copy the entire contents of your source file. Look into isspace and isdigit if you only want to copy the lines which start with spaces/numbers. unwind's suggestion of using fgets would make this much simpler.

share|improve this answer
    
i tried ch==EOF but still not working yet. –  krishcal23 Dec 20 '12 at 11:34
    
Can you be more specific? Is anything printed out? Can you step through the code using a debugger or add printf statements to see what code gets executed? –  simonc Dec 20 '12 at 11:43
    
the code doesn't print anything . just i get a blank "new_node.txt" file. –  krishcal23 Dec 20 '12 at 11:45
    
You had the same problem in a second location. I've updated my answer to list this too. Btw, you'd have found this yourself if you'd tried enabling warnings as I suggested. –  simonc Dec 20 '12 at 11:52

Actually, your problem is pretty easy: you just do not use the right tools. Indeed, in bash (installed by default on most Linux distributions and Mac OS X. For windows, install cygwin or mingw), just this does the job:

tail -n +8 copying_columns.data

This, in fact, starts printing the file at the 8th line, effectively skipping your header. Awk offers a more generic solution:

awk 'x >= 2 {print}; /---/ {++x}' copying_columns.data

that is, print the line if we encountered two or more lines containing ---. In perl, this can give:

perl -ne 'if ($x >= 2) {print $_;} if (/---/){++$x;}

or, if we put the perl script into it's own file, copying_columns.perl:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
my $x = 0;
while (<>){
    if ($x >= 2){
        print $_;
    } 
    if (/---/){
        ++$x;
    }
}

Run with

 perl copying_columns.perl copying_columns.data

As a bonus, here is a Python version:

#!/usr/bin/python
import sys
for f in [open(fname, 'rb') for fname in sys.argv[1:]] or [sys.stdin]:
    x = 0
    for line in f:
        if x >= 2:
            print(line.rstrip('\r\n'))
        if line.find('---') >= 0:
            x += 1
    f.close()

Run with

python copying_columns.py copying_columns.data

This version comes with the extra advantage of resetting the counter between input files.

Finally, here are my two cents: learn (at least :) ) one of those tools: they are marvelously efficient, especially for data manipulation.

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