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I'm new to node.js, I tried to use setTimeout to simulate long connections and hope it act asynchronously.

var http = require('http');

http.createServer(function (request, response) {
    console.log('New request @ ' + request.url);
    (function (response) {
         setTimeout(function () {
             console.log('Time is up');
             response.writeHead(200, {"Content-Type": "text/plain"});
             response.end('Hello World\n');
         }, 3000);
     })(response);
}).listen(8124);

console.log('Server running at http://127.0.0.1:8124/');

But, the code above perform like a synchronous single thread app, which can only handle one request per 3 seconds.

I thought everything in node.js should act asynchronously. So, what's the problem here?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The SetTimeout is async, you don't need that anonym function in the middle, just write this.

var http = require('http');

http.createServer(function (request, response) {
  console.log('New request @ ' + request.url);
  setTimeout(function () {
    console.log('Time is up');
    response.writeHead(200, {"Content-Type": "text/plain"});
    response.end('Hello World\n');
  }, 3000);
}).listen(8124);

console.log('Server running at http://127.0.0.1:8124/');

If you produce 10 concurent request the total comp time will be around 3sec, which means it is async. You can use the ab tool to check, or if you program node, maybe easier to install http-perf. and run nperf -c 10 -n 10 http://127.0.0.1:8124

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I've tested with ab, and you're right, setTimeout is an async function. But, it's a bit strange if I open several tabs in Chrome at the same time, it ends one by one between a 5 seconds interval. –  user1914683 Dec 20 '12 at 12:07
    
I think you just not enough fast clicking between the tabs in chrome.. :) –  balazs Dec 20 '12 at 12:49
    
Chrome will not request the same URL concurrently. If you add a variation to the url, e.g. the first tab requests 127.0.0.1:8124/0, the second requests 127.0.0.1:8124/1, etc, then they should behave like you expect. See stackoverflow.com/questions/15852011/… –  Jason Dec 5 '13 at 16:05
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You need to run your sleep in a new process. There is a module that can help you (https://github.com/cramforce/node-worker) or you can look at the normal api documentaion about spawn.

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var async,
__slice = [].slice;

async = require("async");

async.setTimeOut = function() {
    var arg, args, callback, delay, runWithTimeOut;
    callback = arguments[0], delay = arguments[1], arg = arguments[2], args = 4 <= arguments.length ? __slice.call(arguments, 3) : [];
    runWithTimeOut = function() {
        return setTimeout(callback, delay, arg, args);
    };

    return async.parallel([runWithTimeOut]);
};

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