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Normally when you have an object an objects Equals methods is equal to another object of same type if the two hashcodes are alike.

Does Integer work the same way by comparing hashcodes or does it work in a different way?

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1  
OpenJDK compares the integer values: grepcode.com/file/repository.grepcode.com/java/root/jdk/openjdk/… – irrelephant Dec 20 '12 at 11:48
    
Why is it important for you? – Aleksander Gralak Dec 20 '12 at 11:48
    
@AleksanderGralak im a nerd! – Marc Rasmussen Dec 20 '12 at 11:50
1  
@Marc why don't your wear your hat? – gresdiplitude Dec 20 '12 at 12:11
    
@gresdiplitude haha cant make it work – Marc Rasmussen Dec 20 '12 at 13:47
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Two objects that have the same hashcode need not be equals().

Two objects that are equals() must have the same hashcode.

This basically means you may have (occasional) hashcode collisions.


The Integer equals() method simply compares the int value it wraps with the other Integer's int value. Hashcodes don't come into it.


Note that the equals() and hashcode aggrement is not strictly required, but it is relied upon by the numerous JDK classes that use an internal Hashtable, eg the various java.util.Hashxxx classes.

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@Boemian but if the metod equals considers two objects equal, hashcode must be the same value for both objects – Marc Rasmussen Dec 20 '12 at 11:52
2  
@MarcRasmussen That's exactly what I've said. I've re-worded my answer to make it clearer – Bohemian Dec 20 '12 at 11:54

If you check the source of the Integer.java wrapper class, you can find that the equals method has been overridden to check that both the Integer objects have same int value.

public boolean equals(Object obj) {
       if (obj instanceof Integer) {
           return value == ((Integer)obj).intValue();
       }
       return false;
}

So you can say JDK compares the integer values inside the object.

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Just one correction. java.lang.Integer does not inherit from Object. So the equals method is not an overridden method. It's just a member method. – Raheel Jul 2 '13 at 13:47
    
@Raheel You might need to check here. – Jayamohan Jul 3 '13 at 1:28
    
Thanks you are correct – Raheel Jul 3 '13 at 9:16
    
Looks like java.lang.Integer inherits from Number which inherits from Object. I thought the whole point of java.lang.Integer is that it is an Object. – Mike Beckerle Feb 17 at 3:37

Integer equals() method compares int values as == operator does, See below code of Integer.equals() method.

public boolean equals(Object obj) {
   if (obj instanceof Integer) {
      return value == ((Integer)obj).intValue();
   }
   return false;
}
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Why is it important to you?

Integer#equals checks if two int values are equal, and not just references. So the actual Integer objects might be different (different references), however be equivalent.

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