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Having the following code is there a leaner way of initializing the array from 1 to the number especified by a variable?

int nums=5;
int[] array= new int[nums];

for(int i=0;i<num;i++)
{
   array[i] = i;
}

Maybe with linq or some array.function?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
int[] array = Enumerable.Range(0, nums).ToArray();
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This might create an array which allocates too much memory. ToArray does not know how many elements are in Enumerable.Range. Hence it needs to foreach all of them and always increase the capacity(using a doubling algorith). So you might end with an array which consumes nearly twice as much memory as necessary. – –  Tim Schmelter Dec 20 '12 at 12:05
    
@TimSchmelter Is there then some alternative as simple as this but with less resource consumption? (in my case the range would go to 30 at max...) –  ase69s Dec 20 '12 at 12:07
2  
@ase69s If only 30 entries, then don't worry about it. EDIT: Otherwise, all I can think of is pre-initializing something like a List to your capacity: var items = new List<int>(nums);items.AddRange(Enumerable.Range(0, nums)); –  Chris Sinclair Dec 20 '12 at 12:10
2  
Here's a question related to this issue: High memory consumption with Enumerable.Range? @ase69s: You don't need to care if you only have 30 items. –  Tim Schmelter Dec 20 '12 at 12:12
    
thank you all for your detailed explanations ^^, answer accepted then –  ase69s Dec 20 '12 at 12:14

Use Enumerable.Range() method instead of. Don't forget to add System.Linq namespace. But this could spend little bit high memory. You can use like;

int[] array = Enumerable.Range(0, nums).ToArray();

Generates a sequence of integral numbers within a specified range.

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2  
Also, ToArray does not know how many elements are in Enumerable.Range. Hence it needs to foreach all of them always increasing the capacity(using a doubling algorith). So you might end with an array which consumes nearly twice as much memory as necessary. Here's my own question regarding this issue: High memory consumption with Enumerable.Range? –  Tim Schmelter Dec 20 '12 at 12:09

Using Enumerable.Range

int[] array = Enumerable.Range(0, nums).ToArray();
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