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I am trying to make a for loop which adds new entries to my dictionary which should be in the format of {1:0.5, 2:0.5, 3:0.5....}

I need to make it do this 200 times. But for some reason my code prints out an empty dictionary:

initial_dict = {}

for i in initial_dict.copy():
    if len(i) < 200:
        initial_dict.update({i: 0.5})


print initial_dict

Any ideas?

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1  
Isn't it dict[i]=x? –  Edwin Dalorzo Dec 20 '12 at 12:47
4  
you're iterating over an empty dictionary –  blmoore Dec 20 '12 at 12:48
    
That is going to give you an error. Also, it's very unclear what you're trying to do. For example, the for-loop will never be entered with the current configuration of initial_dict –  inspectorG4dget Dec 20 '12 at 12:48

8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted
>>> d = {}
>>> for i in range(1, 201):
...     d[i] = 0.5
... 
>>> d

or the shorter form using dict comprehensions:

>>> { i: 0.5 for i in range(1, 201) }
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Thanks, this was a lot of help :) –  mrpopo Dec 20 '12 at 13:03
    
Or, the short form in python2.6 or prior: dict((i,0.5) for i in xrange(1,201)) –  mgilson Dec 20 '12 at 13:41

Use a dict comprehension:

initial_dict = {i:0.5 for i in range(1, 201)}
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This generates a range from 0 to 199. Edit: Fixed. –  Fabian Dec 20 '12 at 12:47
    
@Fabian: Since the condition in his script was < 200, I assumed that that's what he wanted. You're probably right, though. –  Tim Pietzcker Dec 20 '12 at 12:49
    
>= python27 Caution!!! –  Goranek Dec 20 '12 at 12:52
In [1]: dict.fromkeys(range(10), 0.5)
Out[1]: 
{0: 0.5,
 1: 0.5,
 2: 0.5,
 3: 0.5,
 4: 0.5,
 5: 0.5,
 6: 0.5,
 7: 0.5,
 8: 0.5,
 9: 0.5}

It's unclear whether you are constructing a new dictionary like this, or need to update an existing one with these keys/values. If the latter, just write:

initial_dict.update(dict.fromkeys(range(200), 0.5))
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1  
Would the downvoter care to comment? –  NPE Dec 20 '12 at 12:51
    
FWIW: I would care to upvote. +1 –  mgilson Dec 20 '12 at 13:44
    
@mgilson: Thank you :) –  NPE Dec 20 '12 at 13:47
    
Some people just downvote for no reason :(, a +1 for correct answer. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Dec 20 '12 at 17:28

initial_dict is empty, so I don't understand how you expect to iterate through a copy of it. That loop will never even enter.

If you just want to create a dictionary with keys 1 to 200, you could do this:

dict.fromkeys(xrange(1,201), 0.5)
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use dict.fromkeys():

help on dict.fromkeys():

dict.fromkeys(S[,v]) -> New dict with keys from S and values equal to v. v defaults to None.

dic=dict.fromkeys(range(1,201),0.5)

example:

In [11]: dic=dict.fromkeys(range(1,10),0.5)

In [12]: dic
Out[12]: {1: 0.5, 2: 0.5, 3: 0.5, 4: 0.5, 5: 0.5, 6: 0.5, 7: 0.5, 8: 0.5, 9: 0.5}

dict.fromkeys() is also more efficient than the dict comprehension:

In [17]: %timeit { i: 0.5 for i in range(1, 201) }
10000 loops, best of 3: 35.8 us per loop

In [18]: %timeit dict.fromkeys(range(1,201),0.5)
10000 loops, best of 3: 21.6 us per loop
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You may write like:

initial_dict = {}
for i in range(1, 200): 
  initial_dict .setdefault(i, 0.5)  

Partial snap short of output:

>>> initial_dict
{1: 0.5, 2: 0.5, 3: 0.5, 4: 0.5, 5: 0.5, 6: 0.5, 7: 0.5, 8: 0.5, 9: 0.5,  

Second way (better):

>>> for i in range(1, 200):
...     initial_dict[i] = 0.5
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interesting solution, can be useful if he'll need to put some other values –  Goranek Dec 20 '12 at 12:50
    
@Goran : I am also new learner .. Am I correct –  Grijesh Chauhan Dec 20 '12 at 12:51
1  
I think setdefault is not require here as it is actually ,D.setdefault(k[,d]) -> D.get(k,d), also set D[k]=d if k not in D. So there's no requirement of setdefault. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Dec 20 '12 at 12:55
1  
@AshwiniChaudhary : Thanks Ashwini :) I understood your point. and Improved my answer too. I am also a new python learner.-Thanks dear –  Grijesh Chauhan Dec 20 '12 at 13:00
1  
@GrijeshChauhan What makes you think I gave you a -1? Actually I never downvote. My downvote counter will remain 85 forever. But I can give you a +1 though for a correct answer. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Dec 20 '12 at 17:24

Simplest way to do this:

my_dict = {}
for i in range(1, 201): # second argument is exclusive
   my_dict[i] = 0.5
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For python 2.7 or 3.x instead of loop you can make it in one line:

dct = {x: 0.5 for x in range(1, 201)}
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>= python 2.7, don't forget that –  Goranek Dec 20 '12 at 12:48

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