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I have problem with default comparator for Strings (in SortedSet). The problem is that default comparator doesn't sort good String that contains numbers i.e.: In set i have:

room1, room2, room100

Natural ordering should be like above but in set I have:

room1, room100, room2

I know why it is but I don't know how to change it.

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6  
You need to create a custom comparartor –  Aviram Segal Dec 20 '12 at 13:44
    
I know but i don't have idea how to compare it. Know I'm trying with this: >private int compareNumbers(String o1, String o2) { Pattern numberPattern = Pattern.compile(PATTERN); Matcher matcher1 = numberPattern.matcher(o1); Matcher matcher2 = numberPattern.matcher(o2); int i1 = Integer.parseInt(matcher1.group()); int i2 = Integer.parseInt(matcher2.group()); System.out.println(i1 + " " + i2); return i1 - i2; } –  MAGx2 Dec 20 '12 at 13:45
    
You need to make assumptions, such as, does all string in the format of <some chars><a number> ? or decide on what exactly your format is, only then you can write your comparator –  Aviram Segal Dec 20 '12 at 13:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

try this. I've assumed that you will always have "room" at the start of your string.

    List<String> list = Arrays.asList("room1", "room100", "room2");
    Collections.sort(list, new Comparator<String>()
    {
        @Override
        public int compare(String o1, String o2)
        {
            return new Integer(o1.replaceAll("room", ""))
                .compareTo(new Integer(o2.replaceAll("room", "")));
        }

    });
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@Vikdor thanks for the edit –  RNJ Dec 20 '12 at 13:48

Here is my Comparator implementation for such a sort: (strings can start from any chars)

public class StringNumberComparator implements Comparator<String>{

    @Override
    public int compare(String o1, String o2) {
    int i1 = this.getRearInt(o1);
    int i2 = getLeadingInt(o2);
    String s1 = getTrailingString(o1);
    String s2 = getTrailingString(o2);

    if(i1==i2)
         return s1.compareTo(s2);
    if(i1>i2)
         return 1;
    else if(i1<i2)
            return -1;
    return 0;
    }

    private int getRearInt(String s) {
    s=s.trim();
    int i=Integer.MAX_VALUE;
    try {
             i = Integer.parseInt(s.split("[^0-9]+")[1]);
    } catch(ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException e) {

    } catch(NumberFormatException f) {
            return i;
    }

    return i;
    }

    private String getTrailingString(String s) {

    return  s.replaceFirst("[0-9]", "");

} }

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Try this comparator, which removes all non-digit characters then compares the remaining characters as numbers:

Collections.sort(strings, new Comparator<String>() {
    public int compare(String o1, String o2) {
        return extractInt(o1) - extractInt(o2);
    }

    int extractInt(String s) {
        String num = s.replaceAll("\\D", "");
        // return 0 if no digits found
        return num.isEmpty() ? 0 : Integer.parseInt(num);
    }
});

Here's a test:

public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
    List<String> strings = Arrays.asList("room1", "foo", "room2", "room100", "room10");
    Collections.sort(strings, new Comparator<String>() {
        public int compare(String o1, String o2) {
            return extractInt(o1) - extractInt(o2);
        }

        int extractInt(String s) {
            String num = s.replaceAll("\\D", "");
            // return 0 if no digits found
            return num.isEmpty() ? 0 : Integer.parseInt(num);
        }
    });
    System.out.println(strings);
}

Output:

[foo, room1, room2, room10, room100]
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Thank you :). It's working. The only thing that I will change is when one of the string will be normal without numbers :). –  MAGx2 Dec 20 '12 at 13:53
    
I've added code that deals with "no numbers" for you –  Bohemian Dec 20 '12 at 13:56

You can implement a comparator and pass it to the set constructor. See http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/util/Comparator.html.

If all your strings are in the form of room[number] you can strip the "room" parse the number and compare by it.
Alternatively - you can store Integers in you set and print them with "room" prefix.

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But I don't have idea how to compare it. Some regex? –  MAGx2 Dec 20 '12 at 13:48
1  
Are the strings always in the form of room[number]? –  Itay Karo Dec 20 '12 at 13:48

A lazy alternative would be to make the String comparator work without doing anything extra (defining your own comparator). You can have that by padding with zeros the numbers within your String like this: room0001, room0002, room0100 then the default String comparator will work. You do however, need to know the maximum number value so you can adapt your padding accordingly.

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