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There is something I do no understood about the for-statement, in the following chunk of code please concentrate on the ??? comment:

void user_interface::execute_a_command( const string& cmd, command cmd_table[] )
{
    LOG("user_interface::execute_a_command(): Executing \"",cmd,"\"");
    bool command_executed = false;
    //Exist any operation for this command?
    command* elem = &cmd_table[ 0 ]; //???
    for( int i = 0 ; cmd_table[ i ].function != nullptr ; i++, elem = &cmd_table[ i ] )
    {
        if( cmd == elem->name )
        {
            //Call the function
            (this->*(elem->function))();
            command_executed = true;
            break;
        }
    }

Well, this code compile well and with no specific warnings. But if I put the declaration and initialization of 'elem' inside the 'for' statement as follow:

for( int i = 0 , command* elem = &cmd_table[ 0 ] ; cmd_table[ i ].function != nullptr ; i++, elem = &cmd_table[ i ] )

g++ 4.7.2 does not compile this code with this error:

game.cpp:834:27: error: expected initializer before '' token game.cpp:834:27: error: expected ';' before '' token

Is not clear to me why. Can someone help me to understand the problem here?

Thanks

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You cannot declare variables of different types in the initializer. If they were of the same type it would work:

for (int ii = 0, jj = 1, kk = 2; ii < count; ++ii, --jj, kk += 15) {
    // ...

Continuing further, multiple variable declarations require that they be of the same type:

int a, b = 2, *c; // Yes
float x, double y, std::string z = "no"; // no
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2  
This doesn't just apply to for-loops – Andreas Brinck Dec 20 '12 at 13:51
    
@AndreasBrinck: I figured it would be obvious from the example, but I' extended it to be sure. – user7116 Dec 20 '12 at 13:58

The initialization in the for statement can define multiple variables but all variables need to have the same type.

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You can't do 2 declarations of different types using the comma operator.

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1  
Perhaps just a nit, but there was no question of using the comma operator; comma in this context is punctuation, not an operator. – James Kanze Dec 20 '12 at 15:11
    
@JamesKanze good point, thanks – SomeWittyUsername Dec 20 '12 at 16:06

Both previous answers are correct and directly address your question, however I'll offer the style I prefer, which is to declare a "convenience variable" like this directly inside the loop:

for( int i = 0 ; cmd_table[ i ].function != nullptr ; i++ )
{
    command* elem = &cmd_table[ i ];
    if( cmd == elem->name )
    {
        //Call the function
        (this->*(elem->function))();
        command_executed = true;
        break;
    }
}

This provides a "clean" access to the cmd_table and doesn't leave you with an invalid elem after the loop has ended. Also, there's no performance hit doing it this way since it's just a pointer which the compiler would optimize anyway.

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