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I have a file whose lines are like that:

EF457507|S000834932     Root;Bacteria;"Acidobacteria";Acidobacteria_Gp4;Gp4
EF457374|S000834799     Root;Bacteria;"Acidobacteria";Acidobacteria_Gp14;Gp14
AJ133184|S000323093     Root;Bacteria;Cyanobacteria/Chloroplast;Cyanobacteria;Family I;GpI
DQ490004|S000686022     Root;Bacteria;"Armatimonadetes";Armatimonadetes_gp7
AF268998|S000340459     Root;Bacteria;TM7;TM7_genera_incertae_sedis

I would like to print any thing between the first tab and last semicolon, like that

EF457507|S000834932     Gp4
EF457374|S000834799     Gp14
AJ133184|S000323093     GpI
DQ490004|S000686022     Armatimonadetes_gp7
AF268998|S000340459     TM7_genera_incertae_sedis

I tried to use regex but it doesn't work, is there any way to do it using Linux, awk or Perl?

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6  
Of course there is. What have you tried and what specifically does not work with what you tried? –  mpe Dec 20 '12 at 14:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could use sed:

sed 's/\t.*;/\t/' file

## This matches a tab character '\t'; followed by any character '.' any number of
## times '*'; followed by a semicolon; and; replaces all of this with a tab 
## character '\t'.

sed 's/[^\t]*;//' file

## Things inside square brackets become a character class. For example, '[0-9]' 
## is a character class. Obviously, this would match any digit between zero and
## nine. However, when the first character in the character class is a '^', the
## character class becomes negated. So '[^\t]*;' means match anything not a tab
## character any number of times followed by a semicolon.

Or awk:

awk 'BEGIN { FS=OFS="\t" } { sub(/.*;/,"",$2) }1' file

awk '{ sub(/[^\t]*;/,"") }1' file

Results:

EF457507|S000834932     Gp4
EF457374|S000834799     Gp14
AJ133184|S000323093     GpI
DQ490004|S000686022     Armatimonadetes_gp7
AF268998|S000340459     TM7_genera_incertae_sedis

As per comments below, to 'remove everything after the last semicolon', with sed:

sed 's/[^;]*$//' file

## '[^;]*$' will match anything not a semicolon any number of times anchored to 
## the end of the line.

Or awk:

awk 'BEGIN { FS=OFS="\t" } { sub(/[^;]*$/,"",$2) }1' file

awk '{ sub(/[^;]*$/,"") }1' file
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1  
Thanks Steve.. It worked Perfectly!! –  Bioinfoguy Dec 20 '12 at 14:35
    
@Bioinfoguy, don't forget to accept this answer. –  RobEarl Dec 20 '12 at 15:28
    
What if I would like to do the contrast, remove everything after the last semicolon? –  Bioinfoguy Dec 20 '12 at 16:14
    
@Bioinfoguy: I've added a couple more examples for you. Please let me know if I can be of further assistance. Cheers. –  Steve Dec 20 '12 at 22:39
    
@Steve: Thank you very much for your assistance! I would appreciate if you have some time to explain the regular expresion.. Cheeeers! –  Bioinfoguy Dec 21 '12 at 12:49

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